What's the best 2 in 1 laptop tablet you can buy in the UK?

Your buying guide to the best laptop / tablets

If you don't want to carry around both a laptop and a tablet then a convertible 2-in-1 device might be the answer. Usually there are some compromises and very few devices offer the best of both worlds.

The Surface Book arguably has the fewest compromises, but it's also massively expensive: you could buy a laptop and tablet separately and still have change left over compared to buying a Surface Book. If nothing here takes your fancy, then do check out our guides to the Best Laptops and Best Tablets.

Although many run Windows 10, which makes sense, there are a few in this chart which come with an alternative operating system including Android so there's lots of choice. Plus, there are two iPad Pro models which will be a legitimate option for some.

Microsoft also has its latest Surface Pro model which is excellent, if expensive. It's at the top of our chart though for its all-round performance and form factor.

What is a 2-in-1 laptop tablet?

Although they've been around for a while, these devices vary quite a lot and are called different things such as convertibles, hybrids and 2-in-1s. They all mean the same thing in essence – a device which is trying to be both a laptop and a tablet.

As we'll explain, there are essentially two different types here and we're going to round up the best of them all in one place.

Tablet or laptop first?

As we said, there is inevitably some compromise with these devices. Typically they will be better at being a laptop or a tablet but some do manage to sit somewhere in the middle.

Some are even designed first and foremost as a laptop, while others are first a tablet, a laptop second. So it depends on your priority as to which type will suit you best.

Which one is right for you depends hugely on what you want to do with it. Do you mainly want a laptop on which to do regular work but can also shapeshift into a tablet for the odd task? Or do you want a tablet which you can also do a bit of typing on when the need arises?

Laptop-first design

A convertible laptop will usually have a non-removable screen which flips almost 360 degrees in order to change it into a tablet. This style (shown below) also means you can use it in other 'modes' such as tent or display.

Convertible laptop modes

Lenovo's Yoga range is possibly the best known convertible laptop and has been the inspiration for many rivals. Microsoft Surface Book is also laptop first, but still has a removable screen.

Tablet-first design

Meanwhile, a convertible tablet (below) is more like a regular tablet but either has a keyboard which attaches magnetically or a fancy case which creates a laptop-like experience. The keyboard may connect over Bluetooth in some cases.

Examples include the Microsoft Surface Pro 4 and the Samsung Galaxy TabPro S and the Huawei MateBook. The latter is not widely available in the UK, but you can buy it for £599 from Currys. That's the cheaper version - the higher-power model costs £799.

Microsoft Surface Pro 4

What specs should I look for?

Much of what you need to look for in a convertible laptop / tablet is the same as for a regular laptop and tablet.

You'll want to get the best specifications for your money including the processor, amount of memory and storage plus a good-quality screen. Make sure you read our reviews to find out more, including benchmark results.

The design, though, is going to be a big part of your buying decision and you need to choose a device which fits your needs best. A laptop-first design is likely to be bigger and heavier but is likely to offer longer battery life (there's more space for a bigger battery).

This type should also provide a better typing experience and there's normally more physical ports, including USBs and video outputs.

Although a convertible tablet might not have many physical ports (some still have full-size USB though), they are smaller and lighter than a hybrid laptop making them great for travelling. The tradeoff is that using it as a laptop is often fiddly and awkward. Look for one with a clever design and proper keys. A trackpad is also a boon, despite touchscreens, but not all feature one.

Best laptop / tablets for 2017 - Convertible and 2-in-1 reviews

1. Microsoft Surface Pro (2017)

Microsoft Surface Pro (2017)
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 11 December 2017

The new Surface Pro is a superb 2-in-1. It’s beautifully built and performs well. The screen is excellent and even the speakers sound good. However, it’s very expensive, especially when you add the cost of the Type Cover and – if you need one – the Surface Pen.

Few should opt for the base model, and you’ll pay a heck of a lot more for a Core i7. Ultimately, while a fantastic device, it’s hard to recommend the Surface Pro unless money is no object.

Read our Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) review.

2. Lenovo Yoga 920

Lenovo Yoga 920
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 30 November 2017

The Lenovo Yoga 920 is an excellent hybrid laptop. It has amazing battery life, great build, good looks, real power and a high-quality screen with a pressure sensitive stylus.

What’s not to like? It’s not great for gaming, and a few similarly slim laptops now have discrete graphics. Display brightness could be higher too and it would be good to see the 4K option come to the UK. However, as that will also come with a higher price we can’t honestly say we’d necessarily recommend it over this model.

Read our Lenovo Yoga 920 review.

3. Microsoft Surface Book 2

Microsoft Surface Book 2
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 11 December 2017

The Surface Book 2 is a stunning piece of work from Microsoft once again. It's a great example of a premium laptop with top-level design, performance and features. We only have a few minor quibbles such as the lack of Thunderbolt.

It might be one of the best laptops you can buy but not everyone should rush out and get one. The price means that it's only justifiable for those who will really make use of its modes, features and performance. For the average Joe, a cheaper rival will suffice such as the Surface Laptop.

Read our Microsoft Surface Book 2 review.

4. Asus ZenBook Flip S UX370UA

Asus ZenBook Flip S UX370UA
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 13 October 2017

The Asus ZenBook Flip S is a near-perfect laptop for someone who wants a hybrid that is very thin and very light, without sacrificing productivity power. A year or so ago a laptop like this would probably have used a Core Y/M-series processor, which just isn’t as powerful.

It won’t please those who hate shallow keyboards, or need a laptop that will definitely last through a full day’s grind, though. If that’s what you’re after, consider the HP Spectre x360 or a non-hybrid touchscreen model.

Read our Asus ZenBook Flip S UX370UA review.

5. Lenovo Miix 510

Lenovo Miix 510
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 8 August 2017

It’s alarming that Lenovo has managed to get quite as close to the Microsoft Surface Pro 4 at half the cost here. High-quality build, a good screen, solid performance and a comfortable keyboard mean there’s nothing to let the side down and make the Lenovo Miix 510 seem cheap or compromised.

Not every part is as good as the Surface Pro 4, of course. The Microsoft keyboard is a little stiffer, the screen is much sharper. However, the two laptops have exactly the same functional benefits and the Lenovo Miix 510 is also competitively-priced next to more conventional slim laptops.

The main point to mull over is battery life. At 6.5 hours with light tasks, the Lenovo Miix 510 won’t last all day long. Consider that everything is crammed into a 10mm-thick shell and it’s no great surprise, though.

Read our Lenovo Miix 510 review.

6. Apple iPad Pro 12.9-inch

Apple iPad Pro 12.9-inch
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 8 December 2015

At £679, few people will buy the iPad Pro instead of an iPad Air 2. It has a great screen and plenty of power, but do you really have a need for this hulking tablet? 32GB of storage will prove too limiting for most people, and the 128GB option with the Pencil and/or keyboard is expensive (that's ignoring the £65 silicone rear cover). If you're considering the Pro, go to an Apple store and hold one to understand exactly how bulky and hefty the new tablet really is. If you can live with all that the Pro is a great choice - just don’t expect it to replace your laptop.

Read our Apple iPad Pro 12.9-inch review.

7. Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch

Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 18 April 2016

There’s no doubt that the iPad Pro 9.7 is the best tablet Apple has ever made, combining the power of the original into the stunning form factor of the iPad Air 2 (with a camera bump). Apple has also added new features such as upgraded cameras and one of the best displays we’ve seen on a tablet. Whether you should buy one is another question, though, and depends on your perspective (see above). For some, the iPad Pro 9.7 will be the perfect balance between work and play while for others it will simply not be up to the job. What we can say is that it’s certainly not the ‘ultimate PC replacement’ as it’s trying to do too many things at once.

Read our Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch review.

8. HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2

HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 27 October 2017

Parts of the HP EliteBook X360 1030 G2 can’t match those of consumer laptops around the price. The screen isn't super-bright and you’ll find higher-resolution panels too.

However, it’s very hard to beat as a laptop for work, particularly if it will need to fit the security protocols of a large company. vPro CPUs are an option, the keyboard and trackpad are both excellent and battery life is superb.

The HP EliteBook X360 1030 G2 is probably too expensive to dole out to the admin staff of a small business. But it’s certainly one of the most desirable business laptops money can buy.

Read our HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2 review.

9. Acer Spin 1

Acer Spin 1
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 19 December 2017

If you want a cheap hybrid and have realistic expectations about performance, you should jump at the Acer Spin 1. It's well-made, is comfortable to type on and has a superb screen for the price. 

We would, however, advise getting the 64GB version unless you are planning on installing virtually nothing. A 32GB phone may leave you with plenty of space, but a 32GB Windows 10 laptop certainly does not.

If you're not bothered about the hybrid factor, also consider Acer's great Swift 1, another laptop that gets you a lot for your money.

Read our Acer Spin 1 review.

10. HP Spectre x360 13 (2018)

HP Spectre x360 13 (2018)
  • Rating: ratingsratingsratingsratingsratings
  • Reviewed on: 11 January 2018

The HP Spectre x360 13 is a charming laptop that looks great and has enough power for most productivity jobs, thanks to the use of Intel’s impressive 8th Gen CPUs. Among its peers the main draw is the 4K-as-standard screen.

Not just sharp, it’s colourful and provides excellent contrast.

You need to decide whether you’d prefer to have a super-sharp screen or killer battery life. The Lenovo Yoga 920 lasts hours longer than the HP, and performs better in benchmarks and games with the same CPU (although if this is thanks to the Meltdown vulnerability, the playing field is effectively levelled).

For our use, which would boil down to at least 80% work, we’d likely pick the Yoga 920. However, those who will appreciate the HP’s rich 4K screen may well be swayed in this laptop’s direction.

Read our HP Spectre x360 13 (2018) review.