So, let's move on to the games! While I played a variety of PlayStation VR games, here are a few of my favourites:

Farpoint

The first game I played was the upcoming PSVR exclusive, Farpoint. Farpoint is different from the rest of the PSVR lineup as it's currently the only game that has a dedicated accessory - PSVR Aim. Aim is essentially a gun, complete with triggers, buttons and a sensor to be used in virtual reality, and provides a much more realistic experience than using the Move controllers.

While the tracking isn't quite 1:1, feeling the gun in our hands and aiming as we would in real life really immersed us in the extra-terrestrial world of Farpoint, and made the overall experience that much better. What isn't clear at this time is whether the controller will work with other shooters, or whether it's exclusive to Farpoint.

 

Anyway, I digress. I find myself stranded on an alien planet with "standard issue equipment" to keep me alive, and the objective of reaching The Pilgrim, a downed space station. The catch? The planet is swarming with aliens of all different shapes and sizes, from small spider-like animals that spit and jump at you to huge behemoths that charge at you with devistating effect. You're supplied with a single weapon at the beginning of the game, and gain more as you advance, helping to keep the game fresh and exciting. 

One worry I had going into this experience was motion sickness, as moving virtually while standing on the spot can cause discomfort for some. However after an extended amount of time in-game, I can happily say that I felt no kind of motion sickness, although I'm not quite sure whether it's down to smart game movement design or the PSVR headset itself. I even found myself running backwards while shooting aliens that were chasing me without any kind of nausea.

Robinson: The Journey

Robinson: The Journey is possibly the most hyped PlayStation VR game to date, and I can see why. From the moment the game started and I found myself in my emergency pod, detail of the textures and environment blew me away. Crytek is famous for creating games with spectacular graphics, and Robinson: The Journey didn’t disappoint.

The graphics are superb and the environment feels ‘alive’, so much so that I felt that I became the lone explorer as I wandered around the jungle searching for HIGS units to scan, and played hide and seek with my pet T-Rex.

The environment is huge and filled with objects to interact with, along with a huge library of pre-historic animals to discover and document. The various puzzles you have to solve throughout the game should keep you engrossed for hours, as it did with me.

It really is a fascinating (if not slightly terrifying) experience to emerge from a cave and look up at a Diplodocus towering above you, chomping away at leaves on trees. You still get the same sense of depth when wearing the PlayStation VR headset, so you really understand just how big those dinosaurs were. It also makes it all the more terrifying when dinosaurs start to charge towards you, but I’ll let you find that out for yourself.

My only complaint? There’s no Move baton support. This is understandable as you have to explore the environment yourself, but I feel like Crytek could’ve incorporated some kind of teleport system similar to that used by HTC Vive developers. Using a controller to explore is fine and it’s fun to look around the virtual world, but it’d be much more immersive if I had the ability to scan, levitate and interact with the world using my own hands.

Battlezone

Battlezone is a reimagining of the 80s-classic built from the ground up for VR, and is another personal favourite of mine because c’mon, who doesn’t like blowing things up with tanks? The campaign can be undertaken off- or online, where users must make their way across a map of hexagonal tiles with each tile representing a randomly generated mission. While I had a lot of fun playing the campaign offline, it did get lonely after a while. So, of course, I opted for the online variant and didn’t regret it one bit.

The ability to communicate with two other PSVR gamers in a single map allows you to co-ordinate your attack, allowing us to take out waves of enemies quickly and effectively. It allowed me a second to appreciate the small details of the game, like the plethora of displays in your cockpit that display live information about your shields, bullets, etc. The graphics and lighting are impressive, especially in the cockpit, and I can confidently say that this game will bring hours of enjoyment to any PlayStation VR gamer.

The London Heist

The London Heist is a mini-game part of PlayStation VR Worlds, and is hands-down my favourite of them all. At one point in the experience, I found myself in the passenger seat of a white transit van next to a typical East London gangster, complete with a bald head and thick cockney accent. I was able to use the PlayStation Move batons, which allowed me to reach out and interact with the environment around me.

The first thing I did? Pick up an empty can and throw it at the driver’s head, of course. Anyway, me and my cockney pal were being chased by a Russian gang on bikes and in cars, and it was up to us to stop the pursuit. The cockney gangster slid an SMG across the dashboard and I instinctively reached out and grabbed it without even thinking about it, and opened fire.

Now, this is where I first noticed the tracking issues with the Move batons. I tried to lean out of the car window to return fire like the gangster I am, and lost tracking because the controllers were outside of the camera’s field of view. While this is understandable, it’s not ideal to lose controller tracking when shooting at gangsters leaning out of the window of a car.

As soon as I retracted from the window, tracking returned and I carried on, but it’s not the point – the immersive feeling I’d felt up until that point had been temporarily lost. Still, I carried on and within seconds had forgotten about the tracking issues.

The game is fairly immersive and realistic, thanks in part to manual reloading. As I had full control of both of my virtual hands, it was up to me to reload the SMG when it ran out of bullets (which it did frequently, as I unleashed a flurry of bullets at our pursuers) by reaching out, grabbing an ammo clip from the bag next to me and shoving it into the bottom of the SMG.

As exploding cars flipped around us and bodies went flying, I completely forgot that I was in my bedroom. As far as I was concerned, I was a gun-toting East London gangster shooting up a rival gang on an empty motorway – and it was great. I even had a slightly thicker-than-normal cockney accent after the experience finished, but let’s be honest, I’m not cut out for the gangster life and that’s why PlayStation VR is great.

It let me experience something that I’m never going to experience in my life, and it was thrilling. The graphics aren’t quite as detailed as the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, but those are more expensive and require a computer two or three times more expensive than a PlayStation 4 to run. It didn’t really matter either, as within seconds of putting the headset on I was fully immersed and stopped caring about things like display resolution and high-quality textures.

Read next: Best PlayStation VR games of 2017

Sony PlayStation VR: Specs

  • 5.7in 1080p OLED display
  • 960x1080 per eye
  • 100-degree field of view
  • 18ms response time
  • 120Hz refresh rate
  • Tracks movement via PlayStation Camera
  • DualShock 4 controller
  • PlayStation Move controller compatible
  • Powered by PlayStation 4
  • 5.7in 1080p OLED display
  • 960x1080 per eye
  • 100-degree field of view
  • 18ms response time
  • 120Hz refresh rate
  • Tracks movement via PlayStation Camera
  • DualShock 4 controller
  • PlayStation Move controller compatible
  • Powered by PlayStation 4

SHOULD I BUY SONY PLAYSTATION VR?

The world that PlayStation VR is going to open for gamers around the world is exciting, and is much more affordable than the high-end VR headsets without trading in on the experience. I’m confident that gamers will enjoy what Sony is offering with the PlayStation VR, and with so many developers actively developing for the platform, it looks to be a solid contender in the VR popularity race.

The experience is immersive and is only made better by the more powerful PlayStation 4 Pro, providing something close to PC-level graphics at half the price of a gaming PC.