That's where the Ryzen Pro 5000 series comes. Across three new chips, the range offers one of the most complete CPU solutions around. It's headlined by the high-end Ryzen 7 Pro 5850U, but there are also Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 versions if you don't need as much power. They are all based on a 7nm process and Zen 3 architecture, with a thermal design power (TDP) of 15W. Here are the key differences:

Here are the key specs:

  • Ryzen 7 Pro 5850U - 8 cores, 16 threads, 20Mb cache, max frequency 4.4GHz 
  • Ryzen 5 Pro 5650U - 6 cores, 12 threads, 19Mb cache, max frequency 4.2GHz
  • Ryzen 3 Pro 5450U - 4 cores, 8 threads, 10Mb cache, max frequency 4.0GHz

Despite the 'Pro' moniker, these specs are identical to three chips from the existing Ryzen 5000 range (Ryzen 7 5800U, Ryzen 5 5600U and Ryzen 3 5400U respectively). The key benefit you're getting here is multi-layer security, something that's crucial in a fast-paced business environment. The full Ryzen Pro 5000 seres come with AMD's Shadow Stack technology, alongside Microsoft's Secured Core PC and FIPS 140-3 certification. AMD Pro also helps improve reliability and management on a large scale, making it perfect for remote working. None of these things are likely to make a big difference to consumers, but they could provide a crucial upper hand to business in guarding against security breaches. 

AMD Ryzen Pro 5000 Series
Image: AMD

As is usually the case, the launch of the Ryzen Pro 5000 series doesn't mean we'll get our hands on them for a while. These chips are designed to be integrated into the next generation of business-focused PCs, although the rapid rollout of Ryzen 5000-powered laptops suggests we won't have to wait too long. We'll update this article as soon as we know more. 

In the meantime, here's everything you need to know about the regular Ryzen 5000 series.