The Oculus GO is an amazing headset that offers standalone VR at a competitive price, but it isn’t designed for gaming and lacks those high-end features that Oculus Rift users have got used to over the past few years. Thankfully, it looks like that’ll be rectified with the launch of the Oculus Quest, the first standalone headset from the company to offer full 6DOF tracking without the need for a PC or tracking stations.

The best part? Many amazing Rift games are being ported over to the Oculus Quest in time for launch, and every headset will ship with the Rift’s Oculus Touch controllers for a high-end, immersive experience. Gamers have been waiting a long time for a gaming-focused standalone VR headset, and it looks like it could finally be around the corner.

Here’s all you need to know about Oculus Quest, from the release date window to pricing details and the key features of the standalone gaming VR headset.

When will Oculus Quest be released?

Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage at Oculus Connect 5 and revealed that the Oculus Quest is due to be released in Spring 2018, though there’s no firm date in place just yet.

What we can do is look back at the release of the Oculus Go, Oculus’ first standalone headset. At reveal the headset was slated for a Spring 2018 release, and was concurrently released on 1 May 2018. This points towards a May 2019 release for Oculus Quest, as long as Oculus sticks to the same release schedule.

We imagine we’ll hear more about the release date soon, and as soon as we do, we’ll be sure to update this section.

How much will Oculus Quest cost?

The Oculus Quest is designed to sit between the Oculus Go and Oculus Rift, and though this isn’t quite reflected in terms of pricing. The standalone VR headset will cost $399 in the US, and while it’s not confirmed just yet, we imagine that’ll translate to £399 in the UK. Oculus likes to keep uniform pricing across the UK and US market, and it’s a similar story with the Oculus Go and Oculus Rift – the former is $199/£199, and the latter is $399/£399.

The $399 price tag will get you a standalone headset with 64GB of memory, though we fully expect a slightly more expensive model with larger storage will be announced prior to release. 

We’re still a little far away from release to discuss pre-orders, but we’ll be keeping our eyes peeled for the best pre-order deals in the coming months.

What does Oculus Quest offer?

So, what is it about the Oculus Quest that makes it so special? The Oculus Quest, like the Oculus Go, is a standalone wireless headset that requires no PC or smartphone for use, but unlike the cheaper headset, the Quest offers 6DOF tracking. This means that in addition to tracking your head movement, the headset is able to track your exact position in the room, allowing you to move around and interact with the environment like with Oculus Rift.

The technology is dubbed Oculus Insight, and uses a combination four ultra wide-angle sensors and computer vision algorithms to track your position in realtime without the need for external sensors like those required by the likes of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. The good news is that the Quest also feature’s Guardian, the border tech from the Rift, so you shouldn’t be bumping into walls and cabinets during your wireless VR sessions.

Of course, 6DOF tracking wouldn’t be complete without controllers that take advantage of the tracking – and that’s what the Oculus Quest offers. In fact, it’s compatible with the Touch controllers for the Rift, and Oculus will ship the controllers along with the headset, allowing you to fully immerse yourself in the environment. The design, button layout and more are the exact same as the PC variant, allowing developers to implement all they’ve learnt about game design on the Rift to the Quest.

While we don’t yet know much in terms of specs, we do know that the Quest will feature the same phenomenal display as the Oculus Go, while also featuring lens spacing adjustment to help maximise comfort during those long gaming sessions. It’ll sport a resolution of 1600x1440 per eye, which is better than the high-end Oculus Rift, and features built-in audio that Oculus claims offers more immersive sound and deeper bass than on any of the range.

Will the Quest eventually replace the Rift? With the specs on offer, it’s not hard to imagine. Especially when you consider you’ll be able to play many of the games currently available on the Rift, which is what we go into detail about next.

Which games will be available on Oculus Quest?

Oculus has confirmed that the Oculus Quest is capable of powering games already available on the Rift, and has confirmed that there will be over 50 titles available at launch, with more in the works for post-release. Though there’s not a full list of games just yet, we do know of a handful coming to the Quest:

  • Robo Recall
  • The Climb
  • Moss

As with the rest of the article, we’ll update this section as Oculus sheds more light on game availability for the Oculus Quest.