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Wish I Could Get Rid of the Car.

  morddwyd 09:29 12 Nov 2016
Locked

Just idly looking at my mileage, less than 400 miles last month.

Wit tax and insurance (not to mention repayments!) it's an expensive method of travel.

Trouble is I need it to carry my power chair.

Suppose I should really be grateful that I can get out and about at all, many can't.

  morddwyd 16:12 14 Nov 2016

Well, the problem is a long way towards being solved.

I've just heard I'v been awarded a War Pensioners Mobility Supplement, which gives me exemption from Road Tax, and will certainly defray insurance!

  bumpkin 18:01 14 Nov 2016

Good, a timely nice result.

  oresome 18:10 14 Nov 2016

The largest cost involved with motoring is usually depreciation of the car and the steepest slope is in the first year or two.

The design life of most is probably under 15 years, but of course they can be run for much longer, particularly if little used and if you are a DIY enthusiast.

So for the cheapest motoring, buy something around 10 years old with 12 months MOT and hope to run it for several more years and don't be too fussed if some of the fancy gizmos fail.

Purchasing a 12 month old ex-lease car escapes the biggest drop in depreciation and still has the benefit of the manufacturers warranty for at least another couple of years, so is worth thinking about as an alternative to buying new or as a means of upgrading to a model you otherwise couldn't afford.

PS

I thought I did well with £20 road tax, but my daughters petrol Fiesta is zero rated.

  OTT_B 20:06 14 Nov 2016

The design life of most is probably under 15 years, but of course they can be run for much longer, particularly if little used and if you are a DIY enthusiast.

I'll try and keep this short.....

The reliability (i.e. the time to first failure) of a car tends to come down to the duty cycles it's put through by the user, rather than the age of the vehicle. But a duty cycle on one car that is OK could easily kill another very quickly. E.g. A small petrol engine car doing the school run and local trips may well be OK for a very long period, whereas a car with a large diesel engine car may fail more quickly.

OEMs use some fairly broad generalisations of duty cycles of cars in market which are specific to the OEM, the type of car that's being tested, and the type of duty cycle the OEM expects a car to undergo. Very, very broadly, around 10 years is the test period for the whole vehicle....but.....this is where durability (i.e. time to the point at which the vehicle can't be practically be repaired) comes in. Depending on the type of durability test, some parts are allowed to fail. Which parts are allowed to fail, how often and the failure mode is what's important. Even then, after 10 years, only a small percentage of cars would be deemed to be at the end of their durability life.

There are some exceptions to this though. Safety critical systems which can't be serviced or checked, and which give no warning to the driver that the system has failed, have a much, much longer reliability standard, and the durability time is the same as the reliability time. Airbags are an example of this, and 20 years+ reliability standard wouldn't be unheard of. That's not to say you can claim on the warranty of a 20 year old car if the airbag fails to deploy, though the OEM may decide on a voluntary recall if problems are found in market on older cars.

Getting a reliable second hand car all comes down to knowledge of its use and service history - making sure that it's use has been in line with the type of duty cycle that it's designed for, that it's not at the end of the expected reliability life for that duty cycle, and that it's been serviced properly . Keeping a car durable is down to ensuring cost effective repairs, i.e. being a DIY (and competent!!!!!!!!!!) enthusiast. In my experience, DIY enthusiasts are very rarely competent and I'd avoid buying a car that's been serviced or repaired by the owner.

Good luck explaining that lot the next time you're trying to negotiate a discount on a car!

  bumpkin 20:47 14 Nov 2016

* Airbags are an example of this, and 20 years+ reliability standard wouldn't be unheard of.*

Yes but once deployed unless you have a very valuable vehicle it goes to the "Total Loss" compound. Great things in my opinion but horrendously expensive to replace. I price I am prepared to pay.

  flycatcher1 16:25 16 Nov 2016

We have two cars and appreciate the independence they give. My wife has a Classic Mini about 25 years old with less than 15000 miles on the clock, it does about 5-600 every year and is very expensive per mile but gives mobility. A ten year old Jazz lives in the garage and does the odd trip, less than ten miles, but comes in handy for longer trips when others drive us to hospital appointments and social occasions.

A friend has a clapped out, smokey Marina and he pays no Road Tax at all, how it passes the MoT Lord only knows. (well actually I do.)

  BT 17:37 16 Nov 2016

*Air bags Great things in my opinion but horrendously expensive to replace*

Guess I've been lucky then. Just had mine replaced on my 09 Reg car on a manufacturers recall.

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