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Who will you blame for a no-deal Brexit?

  Quickbeam 17:47 23 Jul 2018
Locked

Hunt seems convinced that we'll all blame the EU.

Personally I'll lay the blame at the feet of weak government and wobbly opposition...

I think that there would be no doubt that in that scenario, the present government would certainly be the fall guy at the next election.

  wee eddie 23:58 27 Jul 2018

Nicely rounded response FE. I'm glad I'm not the negotiator

  Quickbeam 07:27 28 Jul 2018

wee eddie "Nicely rounded response"

Unlike yours, and others previous near hysterical rants! Don't expect those points to be resolved in our lifetimes.

I still maintain that the biggest risk to those that want Brexit at any cost, any damage, any risk is likely to see today's at school generation seek to rejoin on lesser terms than we have now.

That makes a 'no deal' the most ardent of Brexiteers worst nightmare scenario. We do very much need to trade with our nearest trading bloc and on good terms, especially now that Trump is making no tariff trade overtures to the EU of which we would no longer be part of to benefit from.

  john bunyan 09:37 28 Jul 2018

FE

Your optimism is greatly and sincerity admired.

The Cameron Government, and the Opposition both recommended Remain. The electorate decided to Leave. The current Government decided to obey the decision even though most MP’s were unenthusiastic about it, and they became a minority government perhaps because the electorate were less certain of the referendum result. Instead of trying, on this huge issue, to achieve a cross party consensus on our approach, it took 2 years to produce the current White Paper. I do NOT blame the Government for the current mess, but do blame the Jingoistic few like IDS, Redwood, Rees Mogg etc who relish a hard Brexit.. I am sorry for Mrs May, who is doing her best in spite of these disloyal people. Yes, we will survive whatever happens but my greatest fear is that if it turns sour, a Corbyn/ Momentum Government could well be elected . To me this is the greatest danger.

In the meantime, due to the uncertain outcome, big companies, banks, etc are beginning to move. My former multinational is moving its HO to Rotterdam, and many other moves are going ahead because of the lack of certainty.

I could not wish more strongly to be wrong and hope your optimism is well founded.

  Forum Editor 12:03 28 Jul 2018

john bunyan

"...my greatest fear is that if it turns sour, a Corbyn/ Momentum Government could well be elected . To me this is the greatest danger."

I share your concern. Jeremy Corbyn's pathetically transparent and constant attempts to appeal to young voters and ethnic minorities could well succeed in a post Brexit climate. If that happened, we would see our status in the world slide away. The likes of Trump and Putin would eat Corbyn for breakfast.

  Quickbeam 14:22 28 Jul 2018

"...constant attempts to appeal to young voters and ethnic minorities..."

Well I'm an older white British voter that's already been converted from a generally liberal political outlook to the necessity of an old fashioned full on socialist government!

I keep hearing people threatening us with the prospects of being lumbered with a disastrous Labour government coming to power. does any really not think that the current government is the worst government since the incompetent Heath years...?

  Pine Man 14:43 28 Jul 2018

does any really not think that the current government is the worst government since the incompetent Heath years...?

Definitely the worst Tory Government but definitely NOT the worst government.

  Quickbeam 14:53 28 Jul 2018

OK we can split hairs over Heath Vs Wilson after he walked out!

  john bunyan 15:22 28 Jul 2018

You forget Micheal Foot. We are at over 80% if GDP in debt already , costing, at £50 billion a year in interest, more than the Defence budget. McDonnell talks of borrowing another £500 billion, leaving future generations to clear up our mess. We need a bit of stability, a bit higher taxes and a better managed NHS to reduce waste. It is a fiction that “the rich” and “ Corporations “ would pay enough to cover the Shadow Chancellor’s extra spending as they are too few, and soon relocate if squeezed too hard.We would soon see galloping inflation and high interest rates , as in earlier times.

  roger.roger 15:39 28 Jul 2018

leaving future generations to clear up our mess.

In 2008 the national debt was below £0.5 trillion, it is expected to reach £1.84trillion by the next budget.

chart

For all the austerity measures and the cuts in public spending, that extra £1.34 trillion of borrowing hasn't shown any improvement to the country.

1]: [click here

  rickf 15:40 28 Jul 2018

Fed up of this argument. Does my head in. I am in retirement and I am for JC's Labour. I accept I can't change water into wine and vice versa. Let's just wait and see after we leave with a no deal to continue this conversation. It's snowflakes vs gannons. Ridiculous. Proof of the pudding is in the eating. One of us will have to apologise later.

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