Troubled families and perverse behavour

  oresome 10:16 20 Dec 2016
Locked

The perverse behaviour description doesn't relate to the families, rather the local councils who were paid by results to turn the families round.

This scheme was the brain child of David Cameron and according to official figures was a resounding success with 98% plus of troubled families magically transformed into model citizens.

Of course, Local Councils were able to claim the full Government funding for such success and it has been estimated that the reduction in anti-social behaviour has been enormous.

Only problem is.......it was seen by Local Councils as simply a paper exercise to get Government grants and had little if any discernable impact on problem behaviour over the longer term.

.

click here

  Burn-it 12:49 20 Dec 2016

So what is new there. Councils always pander to central government schemes just for the money.

  bumpkin 13:37 20 Dec 2016

Nothing new, now it seems councils are to get more powers to fine motorists and we know what that will mean, yet another cash cow.

  Forum Editor 13:41 20 Dec 2016

bumpkin

It's all very well to go on about cash cows, but money that Councils receive is spent back in the community, and it helps to defer the inevitable increases in local taxation.

  wee eddie 13:56 20 Dec 2016

Bumpkin: It is usually fairly easy to avoid Fines. Don't Speed and Park in appropriate places

  wee eddie 14:31 20 Dec 2016

The behaviour of Councils, in the way described in the thread's title posting, is little different to us as individuals.

Who has not made a minor alteration to the description of a task, or its outcome, if by such a minor technological inexactitude, one wins a slightly higher remuneration package.

  bumpkin 15:04 20 Dec 2016

wee eddie, I agree with those points but if you drive in London for example is there no body here that has never stopped in a box junction or misunderstood a bus lane for a few moments.

  Forum Editor 09:34 21 Dec 2016

"if you drive in London for example is there no body here that has never stopped in a box junction or misunderstood a bus lane for a few moments."

Probably not, but what has that got to do with councils and their power to fine motorists? If you commit a traffic offence and are caught, you have no argument. It has nothing to do with cash cows.

  oresome 09:54 21 Dec 2016

The issue I have with this scheme is that politicians are always looking for quick fixes and are prepared to stretch the truth to justify spending our money.

There is no doubt that problem citizens cost a disproportionate amount of taxpayer money, but I think the underlying issues are complex and deep rooted and they can't simply be fixed in a few weeks.

I doubt you would see tangible results in the lifetime of a parliament, assuming the resources needed were available and there lies the problem.

  Forum Editor 10:17 21 Dec 2016

"the underlying issues are complex and deep rooted and they can't simply be fixed in a few weeks."

I agree.

The telling statement in the article is this, from the Public Accounts Committee report:-

“The implication of ‘turned around’ was misleading, as the term was only indicative of achieving short-term outcomes under the programme rather than representing long-term, sustainable change in families’ lives,”

Something that most people with any commonsense might have predicted.

  bumpkin 12:38 21 Dec 2016

Probably not, but what has that got to do with councils and their power to fine motorists? If you commit a traffic offence and are caught, you have no argument. It has nothing to do with cash cows.

Maybe not in your opinion but I think it could encourage them to introduce unnecessary restrictions for the purpose of raising cash rather than their intended purpose of road safety and traffic control.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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