So how did this happen then?

  Cymro. 14:40 02 Jan 2018
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Yes I know that cars are quite inflammable and probably had at least some fuel in their tanks but from what I understand the fire spread through all 3 floors of the car park. This is a modern concrete building situated in a city centre within reach of a Fire Station and I would not have not have expected so much damage. Now as Firemen are among a group of workers we are not suppose to ever criticise what went wrong then? No sprinkler system perhaps, but then there are many fires in such sprinkler free buildings and they don't usually end up like this. Now apologizes if necessary to any Firemen on this Fortum but I think this may be one only the experts can answer.

  Cymro. 14:44 02 Jan 2018

I have just had a quick look at the photos of this fire. It seems to me it is going to by one Hell of a job to demolish it.

  oresome 15:20 02 Jan 2018

Looking at the photo, it appears the concrete floor has broken up in the heat, exposing the reinforcement mesh and allowing the fire to travel from floor to floor.

I think the key to extinguishing any fire is to get there quickly and nip it in the bud. Waiting the arrival of appliances from further afield is asking for trouble.

  Forum Editor 15:38 02 Jan 2018

The fire appears to have started in a Range Rover, and spread rapidly to other vehicles. The heat would have been intense, and petrol tanks were exploding - hardly a situation in which is worth fire-fighters putting themselves at risk, given that cars are things, and can easily be replaced.

The firefighters' main priority would have been to stop the fire spreading to adjacent buildings, and they appear to have done that.

When concrete is subjected to extreme heat, the surface can start to 'spall' which means the surface starts to break up. This can expose steel reinforcing bars, and they heat up and expand, causing further damage. This building was exposed to a lot of extreme heat, and I imagine it will not be repairable - it will have to be demolished.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 16:08 02 Jan 2018

Ideal place for a fire to spread - low ceilings and open to the air , it must have acted like a gigantic vented flue.

  Jollyjohn 16:20 02 Jan 2018

And most fire engines I've seen would be way too big to get into the car park to the source of the fire!

  Forum Editor 16:38 02 Jan 2018

An additional problem with fires inside all-concrete structures is that the use of fire hoses on hot concrete can cause rapid shrinkage, and a consequent acceleration in the spalling. If lives are not in danger it's probably better to concentrate on preventing a spread of fire to other properties, and let it burn itself out.

With this fire it was interesting to note that on the top level of the car-park which was in the open air, cars were relatively undamaged.

  bumpkin 19:21 02 Jan 2018

* If lives are not in danger it's probably better to concentrate on preventing a spread of fire to other properties, and let it burn itself out. *

Exactly, lumps of metal (cars) and buildings can be replaced. Just fortunate nobody was hurt.

  john bunyan 19:38 02 Jan 2018

I noticed Two dogs were rescued from cars; maybe from top floor? I also saw burning fuel dropping from floor to floor

  bumpkin 20:00 02 Jan 2018

I noticed Two dogs were rescued from cars

Hot dogs?

  oresome 20:20 02 Jan 2018

I expect the fire service do internal reviews of their performance attending fires, but I wouldn't expect them to publicise these reviews. They'll be used to improve their training procedures for future incidents but there'd be an element of covering their backsides if they were in the public domain.

It would be no bad thing having an independent assessment of a brigade's actions in a number of incidents but I'm not sure how it could be done and of course it's easy to be wise after the event.

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