New Look 'Fat Tax' Clothing Row

  Pine Man 16:25 15 May 2018
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Answered

click here link shows the problem that New Look encountered when they charged more for larger clothes and I wonder what this forum thought.

A large shirt could use twice as much cloth as a small shirt so should the purchaser of the large shirt pay more for it or should the purchaser of the small shirt pay more to subsidise the cost of the large shirt? Should the maker swallow the loss?

I don't profess to know the answer but if you consider children's clothing the cost increases as the child grows so why shouldn't the same apply to adults?

Just some food for thought this sunny afternoon.

The

  daz60 17:19 15 May 2018
Answer

People pay more for a larger house,car,tv, so in principle clothing should cost more.Oversize people who want 'slim fit'clothing know where the gym is.

  wee eddie 17:20 15 May 2018

As the material makes up a very small proportion of the total cost of clothing. I can see that there might be a range of prices on the different sizes in a line.

After all, I expect to pay more for a Magnum of Champagne than I do for a Standard Bottle.

I am tall, I don't expect all you short-arses out there to pay the same price for your trousers. A 5% premium would be no problem to me.

Now, it really is no fault of mine that I am tall and, at 6'3", I am the shortest of the boys in the family.

Next thing, folk will be expecting that Ralph Lauren to charge the same as Primark, for his frocks

  Forum Editor 18:15 15 May 2018

You should pay the price of the product you buy - if the manufacturer charges more, then the retailer is entitled to reflect that in the selling price. Shoes are sold in Nobody should be expected to subsidise the cost of a big shirt.

We all pay the same price for the same style of shoe, regardless of which size we take - presumably because the difference in the quantity of material is negligible.

  canarieslover 18:18 15 May 2018

Having been in tailoring for the first fifteen years after leaving school I know that the larger sizes do take appreciably more cloth. Height does count for some of it but once you get over 46" chest you start having to stagger the patterns so take up a lot more cloth. I remember cutting a suit for a man who was 6'4" and weighed almost 25 stone and used 4.5 yards of cloth whereas the average 5'10" 44" chest could be got out of 3.25 yards. Yes, we charged a bit more for the large customer but not really commensurate with the extra cloth and extra time that the big man took.

  Aitchbee 22:15 15 May 2018

We all pay the same price for the same style of shoe, regardless of which size we take - presumably because the difference in the quantity of material is negligible.

This is not always the case. Aldi and Lidl only cater for small to medium sizes in shoes, typically only selling up to 11 UK or 11½ UK footwear sizes. [for Men]

Must be a size thing?

  Forum Editor 22:48 15 May 2018

Eleven and a half is classed as medium for men?

  Aitchbee 22:53 15 May 2018

FE, I know it's all relative but I take a size 14 [no comments please] and think the 2 bigname stores I've mentioned are missing-a-trick by not catering for big feet.

  BT 08:32 16 May 2018

This is not new. Mail order Catalogues have often charged more for larger sizes. Sometimes there are several prices for the same item as the sizes get larger

  Old Deuteronomy 09:52 16 May 2018

Not quite as big as you Flipper, sorry, Aitchbee, as I take a size 13 but, I gave up trying to buy shoes in high street shops as soon as I could buy online, because few ever had wny 13s in stock, let alone ones i actually wanted.

As for higher prices for larger sizes, when looking at Amazon the bigger shoe sizes, i.e. 13 plus, are often a lot more expensive than smaller sizes and, in some cases, more than twice the price.

> Eleven and a half is classed as medium for men?

Some of us need adult sizes...

  LastChip 16:39 16 May 2018

I don't know what the fuss is about. Anything you buy, whether it's a service or product; if it has more labour, or more materials, you pay more. It's not rocket science.

Would you buy a 23" TV for the same price as a 60"? Of course not.

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