Home deliveries by couriers timing.

  bumpkin 22:14 06 Dec 2016
Locked

Today a van pulled up outside my house and the driver walked up to my front door but did not knock or ring the bell, I was watching him through a window. I ran downstairs and out to the van asking if he had a parcel for me "Yes" was his one word answer. Can I have it then please? "No". Why not I asked "I am early, you have to wait"

I went back indoors and about 3mins later he knocked on the door and gave it to me. Now this I can understand as there was an arranged delivery slot as I may not have been in if he was early but as I was there why could he not give it to me which would give him the benefit of a bit of leeway should he encounter delays later.

  lotvic 22:50 06 Dec 2016

He has the same type of sense of humour as me.

  BT 08:48 07 Dec 2016

Tesco's delivery man has often been seen sitting in his van waiting. Its not often my delivery is the first one of the 1 Hour slot but it does happen occasionally. I told him I don't mind if he's a bit early, but he said the're not allowed to deliver before the allotted time now as their new handheld device (combined Phone, Satnav and computer) records everything.

  Forum Editor 08:53 07 Dec 2016

"why could he not give it to me which would give him the benefit of a bit of leeway should he encounter delays later."

Because a timed delivery slot is programmed into his handheld, and if he records an early delivery he will not have leeway - he'll probably arrive early at the next location, and so on.

It sounds daft, but it actually works better when you have a large number of drops. As long as you arrive at some point during the slot, everyone is happy, but you mustn't arrive early.

  Quickbeam 09:51 07 Dec 2016

"...but you mustn't arrive early."

That's a standard must for bus time tables as people rely on the earliest time, late is OK within reason as you'll still be there.

I think the real reason is that if they consistently work ahead of time, their work load will be increased by their managers.

The obvious thing is to wait out of sight of the delivery address to avoid what the recipient sees as a ridiculous situation.

  Forum Editor 11:45 07 Dec 2016

"..their work load will be increased by their managers."

In general terms, courier drivers are given their delivery schedules for the day, and that's that - it is broadly up to them to decide how they plan their route, as long as they hit any timed delivery slots. Once they have fulfilled the schedule they can go home. There will be another load waiting at six o'clock the next morning.

At this time of year in particular it is worth sparing a thought for courier drivers - they have a gruelling time of it, and pay rates are not spectacular - in London, an Amazon delivery contractor/driver is going to get around £520 a week for doing a pretty stressful job. he/she has to provide the van which must be less than four years old, and pay insurance/tax/fuel costs.

It is not a get-rich-quick business, by any means.

  x123 12:13 07 Dec 2016

About a fortnight ago we purchased some items from one company on the internet. We were given a tracking number and were told DHL would be the couriers. All fine, we got "your order in being processed", "your order is awaiting pickup by the courier", " your order is with the courier". We were just waiting for a ETA.

We had to go to Hertfordshire, 235 miles away on the Wednesday and as we had no notification, my wife came with me. As we passed in to Hertfordshire I received a text telling me the items would be delivered in a time slot of 11.00 to 12.00 that day. 60 minutes notice.

Luckily when we pulled over I was able to Google the company DHL, as they do not take replays to the texts, phone up the company's depot. It immediately recognised my number and gave me options about my delivery, I chose to advance the delivery by 24 hours.

It all worked fine but I think if they could let you know that they will be delivering the next day, it would help. I could have arranged for someone to be there.

  Forum Editor 12:30 07 Dec 2016

x123

It's possible that the driver triggered that message, once he had worked out his route for the day. He wouldn't know which addresses he had to go to until he picked up his load of packages that morning.

If the courier company sent a notification the day before, they wouldn't know what what slot to allocate, so they would possibly generate a 'between 7:00 am and 6:00 pm type of message', which many people find irritating - it means they have to arrange to be in all day.

I don't know that was how it worked in your case, I'm just surmising.

  oresome 12:50 07 Dec 2016

I once purchased a route planner program that had been developed by TNT for use at work.

Enter all the delivery addresses and it calculated the most efficient route to cover them all. I presume this is done now for many deliveries, rather than it be left to the driver to organise their own route, otherwise the forecast delivery time given by some couriers wouldn't be accurate.

  Forum Editor 12:59 07 Dec 2016

oresome

Ah - that sheds some light on what happens. I guess Amazon does the same thing.

If that is the case with all couriers, it makes sense of x123's comment that theycould let you have a slot notification the day before.

  bumpkin 14:07 07 Dec 2016

* in London, an Amazon delivery contractor/driver is going to get around £520 a week for doing a pretty stressful job. he/she has to provide the van which must be less than four years old, and pay insurance/tax/fuel costs. *

We all want deliveries to be as cheap as possible but that is appalling.

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