Is freedom of speech/freedom to dupe...

  Quickbeam 09:22 18 Feb 2019

the gullible on social media, e.g. the ubiquitous 'Fake News' posts for the gullible on Facebook etc about to be brought under government control?

Not before time I think as the social media platforms claim that it's not their job to police their own platforms. Breakfast news also highlighted that current rules on political funding not being sufficient to take into account social media platforms.

  Quickbeam 09:56 18 Feb 2019

And the same concern is being seen in America, the home of the social media giants.

  Quickbeam 07:25 15 Mar 2019

The impetus to police social media may well come from the New Zealand terror attack last night in which they apparently streamed their attack live on social media leaving Facebook to react to an incident, but not before it had been widely shared.

  Forum Editor 11:17 17 Mar 2019

Few people could claim that the answer to the question in your thread title is 'yes'.

Offer people a largely unregulated platform on which they can post information and you'll soon realise that lots of your fellow human beings cannot be trusted to resist the temptation to post stuff that they've made up.

It's all very well for MPs to say that social media companies should be regulated in respect of unacceptable content, but it's not nearly so easy to devise ways in which that could be done without attracting accusations of censorship - who regulates the regulator? You and I might agree that it's irresponsible for a social media site to carry information about how to commit suicide (for instance), but others may disagree, saying that suicide is not a crime, and therefore it is perfectly legal to discuss the ways in which it can be done. Where the line gets blurred is when discussing something turns into inciting or 'facilitating' it.

The difficulties of regulation are magnified when you have over 2 billion active users worldwide, as Facebook does. Those people are accessing the platform from countries all over the planet, and from many different jurisdictions and cultural backgrounds. What is perfectly acceptable in country A may be deeply offensive to people in country B. The people tasked with policing a platform like that must feel as if they are trying to shovel smoke. The sheer volume of daily content makes spotting a problem and dealing with it inside a reasonable time-scale a nightmare task.

To use an oft-heard political saying, something must be done but what, and how and how soon is another matter. To stand a chance of being effective, content regulation of social media platforms requires both international cooperation at government level and whole-hearted endorsement by the media companies involved.

  KEITH 1955 12:49 17 Mar 2019

Hi quickbeam , I agree with you that New Zealand footage should not have been posted. On very rare occasions things happen and the events are denied by the authorities UNTIL somebody posts footage on social media.

Just in case your wondering i don't do facebook etc , the only thing of that type i use is twitter to keep track of what certain people in the music industry are doing.

  Quickbeam 13:44 17 Mar 2019

Regarding the sharing of the shooters live stream... Don't or can't videos be identified with meta data and all instances of sharing be easily deleted by the platform managers?

What is Markdown?

Markdown lets you add more formatting to your post. Simply type in your post and it will display as written.

If you wish to add bold or italic characters, add a hyperlink to another website, a heading or a horizontal line, simply use the relevent icons above the text input field.

A preview of your post will appear in the grey box below. If you make a change and you're not happy, simply press the back arrow icon to undo.

Post a Reply

4500

Elsewhere on IDG sites

Huawei MateBook X Pro (2019) review

Magical mystery tour - Artist colourfully customises bus to promote positive mental health

Apple Streaming Service Release Date & Apple TV Subscription Rumours

Quel est le meilleur iPad ?