End pensioner benefits to help young', peers say

  Cymro. 13:36 25 Apr 2019
Locked

BBC link

Well I'm a pensioner and as long as the money did actually go to help the deserving young then I would be willing to agree.

  HondaMan 22:31 26 Apr 2019

Anyone of pensionable age who receives a means tested benefit should continue to receive the benefits. Therefore, those not in receipt of means tested benefits should only have to qualify for a means tested benefit to get the benefits the government is proposing to cut

  Quickbeam 06:01 27 Apr 2019

HondaMan

That sounds simple and fair, but read in the Daily Mail over the breakfast tables in Tunbridge Wells, it will be interpreted as an assault on the aged by the majority of pensioners!

  john bunyan 07:18 27 Apr 2019

A simple way to get a lot of it back would be to make them taxable. That way only those earning above the tax threshold would be affected.

  Pine Man 08:38 27 Apr 2019

A simple way to get a lot of it back would be to make them taxable.

I may have misunderstood your post BUT pensions ARE taxed. It is not taxed at source but taken into account by HMRC when assessing any additional income from other pensions etc.

  Quickbeam 09:02 27 Apr 2019

Of course it doesn't say much about us as a nation that feels that it has to start rescinding benefits that we've given to older vulnerable citizens to make their life more affordable.

If we had old age pensions on the same scale of other prosperous (we do count ourselves as a prosperous country don't we...?) European nations, we wouldn't have the need to give out maundy benefits to salve our consciences.

Personally on the question of selling property up to fund elderly care, I see it as a betrayal of the post war socialist promise of cradle to grave social care. It involved changing the rules midway for people that planned in good faith to cover for our own governments economic incompetence over the decades. These proposed elderly benefit cuts also fall into that category as do bumping up the state retirement age in the hope that more will pop their clogs in time to save on paying old age pensions out. What sort of a prosperous country are we that's looking to raise the state retirement age towards 70 in the 21st century!

Well it's worked so far for the first generation to find themselves in this OAP 'wealth' trap, but will fail for the second generation of OAPers, myself included. I paid into a private pension from my 20s, so have given a responsible thought to my old age finances. It's not a fantastic level of pension, but it allows me at 63 to step back, do some part time work and still be as well of as when I worked full time. When the OAP kicks in, I'll have the option to drop my 25/30 hours. With the changes in pension funds over the last few years, I don't have to opt for a lower lifetime annuity pension but can take a higher pension that will run out at 80. My house asset will then be my funded income via a lifetime mortgage or similar at that time. It's something that I worked for, I paid for and what I consider to be MY asset to fund my personal active retirement, not to subsidise government economic failings . When I'm ready to sit in a chair dribbling away in my dotage, I expect to get the same free care as those that pissed every penny up the wall during their lives, and got everything for free because they didn't take any responsible financial action in their 20s.

You may thing that this is selfish, but it's my choice, and the money that is in my control while I still have my marbles will go to the government in the way of a 20% VAT take as I spend it, and into the local economy where it's spent. That in my mind is a fair exchange for my cradle to grave promise that was granted in 1945, that in the 70s, I based my future retirement funding on.

If we are truly a prosperous country, this promise should be considered as sacrosanct as the philosophy of the NHS's 'free at point of delivery' promise.

And yes, I do know that this cost must be paid for from the taxes of the working of today. That philosophy is no different to third world cultures that take care of their elderly within the immediate family, but in the modern first world, that family care has become the state's responsibility, funded via taxation.

  LastChip 11:57 27 Apr 2019

"You may thing that this is selfish,...."

No I don't. I agree with every word you've written. Those of us that have made responsible choices are likely to be hammered due to gross incompetence of the government.

  john bunyan 14:53 27 Apr 2019

Pine Man

I know that state PENSIONS are taxed . I have a mix of UK and Dutch old age pensions which are taken into account in my tax code for my company pension. However the items concerned in the Lords were TV licence, Winter Fuel payment etc that are currently untaxed.

The state pension itself should not be means tested since most occupational pensions assume you will receive the state one.

The question of who pays for care homes is a complicated one . It does seem an anomaly that Scotland, helped by Barnett, that provides them with over £1500 per head more than the U.K. average, and whose average tax take is more or less the same, are able to do a better job. If we are a United Kingdom, we should have a similar policy for such an important issue. Not that Scotland should change but why are the English not given the same?

  Pine Man 15:15 27 Apr 2019

JB

However the items concerned in the Lords were TV licence, Winter Fuel payment etc that are currently untaxed.

'I may have misunderstood your post' - I sure did - my apologies.

  john bunyan 15:32 27 Apr 2019

PM

No need at all to apologise! Easily done .

  wee eddie 16:28 27 Apr 2019

The Free TV licence & Winter Fuel payment were used as a way of increasing the Pension at a time when such an increase in The Basic Pension was regarded as unacceptable

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Elsewhere on IDG sites

Motorola Razr (2019) confirmed: Release date, price and specs

Photoshop for iPad is finally out – but what do designers think?

MacBook Pro 16in review: Hands-on

Motorola Razr (2019) : date de sortie, prix et fiche technique