Wireless connection

  [DELETED] 19:47 04 Feb 2006
Locked

I use NTL broadband and am going to connect to a single pc using a Belkin P5D7230 router and a USB network adaptor.
The NTL modem is currently connected to my pc using the USB option rather than through an ethernet cable as I do not have a PCI network card in my pc.
The instructions for the Belkin unit state I should connect to the pc through an ethernet cable to a network card in order to initially set it up.
Is it actually necessary to fit a card in my pc just to do the set up as I have been told that I could allow the Belkin unit to set itself up wirelessly through the USB adaptor?
I also need to reset my NTL modem settings from USB to ethernet, which is simple enough, but does that need to be done by also connecting to an ethernet card or could that be done through the wireless router?

Also I was going to use a USB network adaptor to receive the signal. I only have USB 1.1 on my pc.
How much of a disadvantage would this be compared to fitting a card into the pc?

At the end of the day, I don't want to have to fit a network card just to set it all up if I don't have to.

  [DELETED] 19:50 04 Feb 2006

You can set up the router via a USB wireless adaptor (a USB 2 adaptor in a USB 1.1 port will be fine) but what if the wireless "goes down". How will you change the settings or secure the router? AS soon as you make a change to the security you'll be locked out of the router is you do it wirelessly. For £10 get a network card. Much easier.

  [DELETED] 12:25 05 Feb 2006

Thanx paulB2005.

I understand that running the USB adaptor on my USB 1.1 connection works ok, but would it slow downloading of files down excessively compared to using a card fixed in the motherboard?

  [DELETED] 13:04 05 Feb 2006

Nope

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