WIRELESS BROADBAND FOR 2 PC'S

  LAKIN 19:26 31 Dec 2005
Locked

I HAVE A PC DOWNSTAIRS CONNECTED TO BROADBAND. I NOW HAVE A SECOND COMPUTER UPSTAIRS WITH WHICH I WISH TO SHARE MY BROADBAND CONNECTION. THERE IS NO NETWORK IN PLACE AND I DONT WANT TO START RUNNING CABLES IN! WHATS THE BEST WAY TO GO, HOW DO I DO IT AND WHAT DO I NEED. THANKS

  firerescue999 19:31 31 Dec 2005

You could buy a wireless router. A router allows computers to share the internet connection and a wireless network will allow you to send a wireless signal to the 2nd PC. I would contact your ISP for advice on which wireless router you require. HAPPY NEW YEAR.

  mgmcc 20:38 31 Dec 2005

To create a wireless network for Internet access and File/Printer sharing, you have essentially two options:

1) Install a Wireless Network Adapter in each PC and create an “Ad Hoc” Wireless Network. This is a network in which the two PCs talk directly with one another, rather than via a Wireless Access Point. “Internet Connection Sharing” is then enabled on the actual Internet connection in the “host” PC and the “client” PC will have Internet access provided the “host” is running and online.

When you enable “Internet Connection Sharing” on the Internet connection, it automatically configures the Local Area Connection with the IP address 192.168.0.1 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0. However, as you will be using a WiFi adapter, you want this address to be allocated to it, rather than a “wired” Ethernet adapter if you have one fitted, so the Local Area Connection should be disabled before setting up “Internet Connection Sharing”. The "Client" PC's Local Area Connection should be set to get its IP address automatically, which it does by DHCP from the "Host" PC. Also, if you run the Zone Alarm firewall in your “Host” PC, the Internet Zone Security level must be reduced from High to Medium or “ICS” traffic will be blocked.

To enable “Internet Connection Sharing” in Windows XP, open the Network Connections folder, right click the actual internet connection (modem connection), select Properties and then the Advanced tab. Tick the box “Allow other network users...etc”.

2) The preferred option for connecting more than one computer is to use a broadband Router and, with ADSL, this should be a combined “Router/ADSL Modem”. This is an ”Infrastructure” wireless network because the connected PCs communicate via the router’s Wireless Access Point. Again, a wireless adapter is installed in any PC that needs to connect wirelessly, but often the main PC is close enough to the router for it to use a “wired” connection with only the remote PC connecting wirelessly

With a router, it is the router which connects directly to the ISP and not one of the connected PCs. The router in turn allocates the IP addresses to the PCs, using one of the address ranges reserved for Local Area Networks, usually 192.168.xxx.xxx

Either of these options will additionally allow you to run File and/or Printer Sharing wirelessly across the network.

If you are running software firewalls, the IP addresses of the networked PCs must be put into its "trusted" area to allow them to communicate with one another.

  palinka 20:39 31 Dec 2005

You'll find lots of threads on this topic in this forum.
Basically you don't ned wires around the place if you get a wireless modem-router +PCI card for each PC. The new router will replace your existing BB modem. There aRE plenty of places to by a kit containing ll these parts and they will come with installation disks, too.
By using a router you can also have one PC on & using BB even if the other is off; or equally they can both be sharing the BB connection at the same time.
I don't think it's necesary to ask your ISP about which router to buy - I use a BT voyager 2100 (without any consultation with my ISP which happens to be Pipex). And why that router? Simply because at the time I was taking my first plunge into unknown territory and the BTshop site showed everything I needed (as I've described above) which gave me confidence to go ahead.

  palinka 20:56 31 Dec 2005

try this thread click here but there are lots more (type "wireless" into the forum search box). And that thread was about linking a desktop with a laptop, but the system is the same, just a different bit of kit required in a laptop from that in a desktop.

  LAKIN 14:54 01 Jan 2006

THANKS ALL. IF I GET A WIRELESS ROUTER DO I NEED A USB ADAPTOR FOR BOTH PC'S OR DOES THE ROUTER CONNECT TO ONE PC THEN A USB ADAPTOR TO THE OTHER. IF SO HOW DOES THE ROUTER CONNECT TO THE PC.
I ONLY HAVE USB 1.1 ON MY MAIN PC (NEW ONE IS IN DAUGHTERS BEDROOM FOR MSN!!!) SO I AM THINKING OF BUYING A USB 2.0 PCI CARD. WILL ANY DO. THEY ALL SEEM TO SPECIFY PENTIUM SPEC AND I HAVE AN AMD ATHALON?

  ABI2GAIL 15:02 01 Jan 2006

I just bought a belkin router and it has to connect via ethernet so i had to get another cable and the adapter on the second comuter connects via usb

  mgmcc 15:19 01 Jan 2006

<<< IF I GET A WIRELESS ROUTER DO I NEED A USB ADAPTOR FOR BOTH PC'S OR DOES THE ROUTER CONNECT TO ONE PC THEN A USB ADAPTOR TO THE OTHER. IF SO HOW DOES THE ROUTER CONNECT TO THE PC >>>

Wireless Routers normally incorporate both a Wireless Access Point and a 4-port Network Switch. This means that you can connect to it either with a conventional network adapter by ethernet cable or wirelessly from a computer with a Wireless Network Adapter installed.

<<< I ONLY HAVE USB 1.1 ON MY MAIN PC >>>

USB 1.1 shouldn't be a problem for internet access as its data transfer speed of 12Mbps is well above the relatively slow speed (in networking terms) of a broadband connection. For file transfers between computers, the restricted speed will be significant. USB 2.0 transfers data at 480Mbps and therefore allows an 802.11g wireless adapter to transfer at its nominal speed of 54Mbps.

<<< WILL ANY DO. THEY ALL SEEM TO SPECIFY PENTIUM SPEC AND I HAVE AN AMD ATHALON? >>>

I installed a Belkin USB 2.0 PCI card in my PC with an AMD Athlon processor and haven't had a problem with it.

  Taff™ 17:41 01 Jan 2006

We might have forgotton to ask the question. (Apologies if I missed it!)You need a Cable Wireless Modem if you are with Telewest or NTL for example whereas a Wireless ADSL Modem Router described above works with the normal telephone line broadband. Who is your ISP?

  LAKIN 18:19 01 Jan 2006

I HAVE ADSL (THROUGH MY TELEPHONE LINE) WITH TISCALI.
DO I NEED TO ADD A CARD TO MY COMPUTER AS I'VE LOOKED AT SOME ROUTERS AND THEY ALL SEEM TO SAY THAT I NEED A NETWORK PCI CARD.
ALSO I DON'T HAVE AN ETHERNET CONNECTION ON MY COMPUTER, JUST A CARD WITH STANDARD INTERNET CONNECTION. COULD I SWOP THIS CARD FOR ONE WITH BOTH (STANDARD INTERNET CONNECTION AND ETHERNET - IF SUCH A THING EXISTS!) OR IS THERE NO NEED.

  mgmcc 21:06 01 Jan 2006

<<< DO I NEED TO ADD A CARD TO MY COMPUTER AS I'VE LOOKED AT SOME ROUTERS AND THEY ALL SEEM TO SAY THAT I NEED A NETWORK PCI CARD.
ALSO I DON'T HAVE AN ETHERNET CONNECTION ON MY COMPUTER, >>>

A Network PCI card, ethernet connection, network adapter, NIC (network interface card) are all the same thing, just different names. To connect to a Wireless Router, the PC must have either a "wired" or a "wireless" network adapter installed. In both cases, they can be either internal PCI cards or USB.

Most routers, however, require a "wired" connection for the initial coinfiguration and thereafter can be used completely "wirelesly". It doesn't matter which computer is used to set up the router - if one has a network adapter already installed, use that.

A bit of friendly advice:
Don't post messages in capital letters. It is the "online" equivalent of shouting, is generally frowned upon and is actually harder to read than normal lower case text :-)

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