Powerlinking... How does it work?

  Simsy 19:22 25 Feb 2011
Locked

Folks,

I have just discovered that I can get iplayer on my TV via an ethernet connection...

So I need to get the ethernet near to the TV... one option, (I think!), is to get a wireless access point near the TV, to receive the wireless signal from upstairs, and plug a short cable into the TV...

Another is to use "powerlinking", (no specific brand intended), where the broadbeut, but the two rooms concerned are on different ring mains...

I'm guessing that the signal is carried using the earth and neutral circuits??

Can anyone confirm if that is right... or point me to any diagrams... Aquick search hasn't proved fruitful.

Thanks in advance,

Regards,

Simsy

  Simsy 20:22 25 Feb 2011

Not sure what happened there...
But since posting I've discovered several references to different ringmains not being ideal, anyway...
So I think I'm going the wireless access point method.

If anyone can make sense of my original post, I'd still appreciate an explanation of how it works, (or is suppoosed to!)

Regards,

Simsy

  mgmcc 09:06 26 Feb 2011

A "Wireless Access Point" is not the answer. Think of the WiFi adapter in a computer as the "sending" device and the Wireless Access Point (in a router) as the "receiving" device, thus they communicate.

Installing a second Wireless Access Point for the TV won't be able to communicate wirelessly with the router, as they're both "receivers".

What you actually need is a "Wireless Network Bridge". This is the opposite of a Wireless Access Point and lets a "wired" network (your TV connected by ethernet cable) connect to a "wireless" network (your wireless router).

  Simsy 10:36 26 Feb 2011

So I need a "Wireless network Bridge"... I'll take that onboard...

However, I'm not sure I follow the sending/receiving analogy that you've used...

Surely the wifi adapter in a computer, (laptop or otherwise), is a both "sender" and "receiver". It must be a "sender" to send files out that I can see on another PC on the network, and "receiver" to see files coming the opposite direction?

I'd appreciate any clarification!

Thanks,

Regards,

Simsy

  mgmcc 11:34 26 Feb 2011

Yes, you're right. Of course a WiFi adapter and a Wireless Access Point can transfer data in both directions, I was merely explaining in over-simplified terms that two Wireless Access Points cannot communicate directly. The same isn't true, however, for WiFi Adapters because they can be configured to operate in "Ad Hoc" mode and be networked without a Wireless Access Point ("Infrastructure" mode).

  Simsy 14:23 26 Feb 2011

Thanks!

I'm still open to anyone explaining how the mains networking works!


Regards,

Simsy

  100andthirty 21:05 26 Feb 2011

I hope what follows isn't patronising.

Mains networking simply sends the data signals over the mains wiring - live and neutral. Each plug incorporates circuits that protect your computers and other devices from mains voltages and currents, and codes the data at frequencies suitable for transmission over the mains. Treat it a bit like a normal ethernet with mains running on it!

I have 4, 200mbps devices. Three are on one ring main and the other is on the other ring main. So the signal to the one on its own ring main goes via the consumer unit to the furtheest part of the house. It just works. Try it!!

  Simsy 21:54 26 Feb 2011

"Mains networking simply sends the data signals over the mains wiring - live and neutral"...

So if different ccts or rings are involved the connection would be broken by a fuse/breaker being off...

If neutral and earth were used that wouldn't be the case...
or am I missing something?

Regards,

Simsy

  Simsy 21:55 26 Feb 2011

"Mains networking simply sends the data signals over the mains wiring - live and neutral"...

So if different ccts or rings are involved the connection would be broken by a fuse/breaker being off...

If neutral and earth were used that wouldn't be the case...
or am I missing something?

Regards,

Simsy

  Simsy 03:56 27 Feb 2011

That makes sense... but I'm sure I read, in the instructions to one make, that it was important that the plus socket was turned OFF, which would have the same effect...

Or did I read that wrong? Perhaps it was important that the socket ISN'T turned off?

Thanks,

Regards,

Simsy

  dms_05 10:00 27 Feb 2011

If you are in a private dwelling then it's extremely likely that all your electrics are on the same phase. If you are in an large office or workplace then this may not be the case. You need to have all the powerline adaptors on the same phase to work.

I have several powerline adaptors from several manufacturers in my home and they all work well together. You can (just to confuse you!) buy a powerline adaptor with a built in WiFi connection which allows you to use the mains wiring to locate two WiFi systems widely apart using the same router.

I find these people to be very good suppliers click here

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