Partitions - which type is best?

  Kungfu Monk 22:16 19 Mar 2005
Locked

I want to create some new partitions for my documents, but I'm not sure what type (primary, extended or mounted) will work best.

What are the pros and cons of each type of partition for use on a multi-user XP Home PC with privacy settings on each users' My Documents folder?

What's the best way of moving and organising each users' documents onto their own partition while maintaining privacy and functionality?

When experimenting, I couldn't get each users' Name folder (that contains all their files and favourites) to move from C: to another partition.

  LastChip 22:48 19 Mar 2005

You create a Primary partition on your hard drive and use the remainder of the drive space as an Extended partition.

Within the extended partition, you create Logical Drives, and it is these drives that appear as more drive letters in Windows.

How you do it depends upon whether you are partitioning a new drive, or want to modify an existing one.

Further, in Windows XP, you have the choice of two different File systems; FAT 32 or NTFS. Both have Pro's and Con's and it depends upon what you want to do with your machine as to which would be beneficial for you.

  Kungfu Monk 23:10 19 Mar 2005

Yeah, I know all that. That's the easy stuff. The tricky bit is figuring out which partition system is best for my particular set-up, i.e. maintaining the privacy of user folders while avoiding problems with the folder structure.

My experience of folder privacy versus user account functionality when using partitions has not been positive so far.

I want to get it to work better than it currently does, but I would still like to keep all documents separate from the system partition.

  lotvic 23:24 19 Mar 2005

How to Change the Default Location of the My Documents Folder
Applies To This article was previously published under Q310147
SUMMARY
This article describes how to change the default location of the My Documents folder in Microsoft Windows XP.
MORE INFORMATION
The My Documents folder is your own personal folder in which you can store your documents, graphics, and other personal files. When there is more that one person using the computer, Windows creates a My Documents folder for each user on the computer.
By default, the target or actual location of the My Documents folder is C:\Documents and Settings\user name\My Documents, where C is the drive in which Windows is installed, and user name is the currently logged-on user. You can change the target if you want My Documents to point to a different folder location.
Change the Default Location of the My Documents Folder
To change the default location of the My Documents folder, follow these steps:
Click Start, and then point to My Documents.
Right-click My Documents, and then click Properties.
Click the Target tab.
In the Target box, do one of the following:
Type the path to the folder location that you want, and then click OK. For example, D:\My Stuff.
If the folder does not exist, the Create Message dialog box is displayed. Click Yes to create the folder, and then click OK.
-or-
Click Move, click the folder in which to store your documents, and then click OK twice.
If you need to create a new folder, click Make New Folder. Type a name for the folder, and then click OK twice.
In the Move Documents box, click Yes to move your documents to the new location, or click No to leave your documents in the original location.
Restore the My Documents Folder to Its Default Location
To restore the My Documents folder to its default location, follow these steps:
Click Start, and then point to My Documents.
Right-click My Documents, and then click Properties.
Click Restore Default, and then click OK.
In the Move Documents box, click Yes to move your documents to the new location, or click No to leave your documents in the original location.
Remove the My Documents Folder from the Start menu
If you do not want to display My Documents on the Start menu, follow these steps:
Right-click Start, and then click Properties. Or, if the Start menu is already displayed, right-click an empty area of the Start menu, and then click Properties.
Click Customize.
Click the Advanced tab.
In the Start menu items list, under My Documents, click Don't display this item, and then click OK twice.
The next time you click Start, the My Documents folder is no longer displayed on the Start menu.
NOTE: Removing the My Documents folder from the Start menu does not remove the files stored in the target location of the My Documents folder.
Display the My Documents Folder on the Start menu
To display My Documents on the Start menu, follow these steps:
Right-click Start, and then click Properties. Or, if the Start menu is already displayed, right-click an empty area of the Start menu, and then click Properties.
Click Customize.
Click the Advanced tab.
In the Start menu items list, under My Documents, click Display as a link or Display as a menu, and then click OK twice.
The next time you click Start, the My Documents folder is displayed on the Start menu

  Kungfu Monk 23:42 19 Mar 2005

Thanks for that article, lotvic. I came across that one among many others when I was searching the KB today.

I find Windows XP to be quite limiting in what user folders you can move and how they're treated. For example; If one of the other user accounts is limited, they can still see a link to my documents in My Comp, but the link to their's vanishes!

I wish I could find a way of controlling what is actually displayed in each users' My Comp window, i.e. only allow them to see drives and folders that they need to access. The privacy settings don't seem to achieve this correctly.

Is there a way of doing that apart from just changing privacy settings?

  Kungfu Monk 23:45 19 Mar 2005

"but the link to their's vanishes!"

Forgot to add that this happens when their documents are on another partition and the account originally had full access.

  LastChip 23:57 19 Mar 2005

I think you will find you're fairly limited with XP Home in what you want to achieve without using third party software.

Really, you need XP Pro to enjoy the full security enhancements.

  Jeffers22 00:09 20 Mar 2005

Or Linux!

  LastChip 00:31 20 Mar 2005

But that isn't really the question asked is it ;-)

In fact the question referred to partitions, but I think it is more bent towards file security/availability and has little to do with partitions.

  lotvic 01:02 20 Mar 2005

"In fact the question referred to partitions, but I think it is more bent towards file security/availability and has little to do with partitions."

Yep, I second that :)

  powerless 01:27 20 Mar 2005

Unless I failed in my nerd test, you will not see any pros or cons with choosing [which] partition type.

You'll see no improved access time, security with the partition type.

The file system on the other hand....yes. NTFS all the way for me.

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