new hard drive

  tammy11 22:29 18 Nov 2003
Locked

i have just installed a new 120gig hd,but i only have 111gig available to use,is this right?.seems a lot of space to lose when there is nothing on the drive.any sugestions please.

  Cretin07 22:30 18 Nov 2003

hm.. is this ntfs? usually converting to ntfs uses quite alot of space. wellfor me anyway. but not that much, say about 5 gig.

  DieSse 22:34 18 Nov 2003

Yes, you're OK. It's all in two different ways to describe the size.

The "computer" way, where 1Kb = 1024 bytes, OR

The ISO way where 1Kb = 1000 bytes.

Whichever way it's described, you get

120,000,000,000 bytes (approx).

  Cretin07 22:38 18 Nov 2003

1024 megabytes is 1 gig. and that times 120 is about 121 or something. doesnt make sense somehow, but i think your right in a way. I'm puzzled tbh.

  DieSse 22:45 18 Nov 2003

No, 1024Mb is NOT 1Gb.

1024bytes is 1Kb.

So the sum is 111Gb = 1024x1024x1024x111 = nearly 120,000,000,000bytes

Which when expressed with ISO terminology is 120Gb.

  Cretin07 22:47 18 Nov 2003

i said 1024 MEGABYTES and it IS 1 GIGABYTE. I am certain.

  Cretin07 22:48 18 Nov 2003

look 8 bits is a byte. 1024bytes is a kilobyte. 1024 kilobytes is a megabyte and 1024 megabytes is a gigabyte. and 6 gig is a tb but not needed to know.

  keith-236785 22:48 18 Nov 2003

if you have formatted the drive then i would say it is correct.

my 80 gig H/D is only actually 74.3 gig after being partitioned into three and formatted.

i have lost 5.7 gig on 80, so

rough maths, 5.7 * 1.5 (cos your drive is 1½ times the size of mine)= 8.55 gig lost so

120 - 8.55 = 111.45 gig which is about what you have.

hope this helps

  Quiller. 23:03 18 Nov 2003

Yes you are about right.

My 40 gig comes out at 37.5. Loosing 2.5 gig.

My 80 gig comes out at 75.0. loosing 5.0 gig.

  DieSse 23:16 18 Nov 2003

You do not lose anything of any significance by formatting - it's all in the numbering system.

Cretin07 - yes - my apologies, 1024Mb is 1Gb.

But to find the total number of bytes in 111Gb ("computer" numbering system) You still need to do the sum I gave

111x1024x1024x1024 = 120,000,000,000 bytes (approx) = 120Gb (ISO numbering system)

It all originally stems from binary numbers.

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