network hub

  conquistador 20:51 25 Apr 2005
Locked

I am currently using lan cards and a crossover cable so my son can share my internet connection. I find this a bit inconvenient as when i finish on my pc, i have to leave mine on so he continues to have the internet. It took a bit of setting up originally as i think i had a conflict with my pc. My question is: 1)Is it easy just to use a hub, connect my cable to the hub and use two feeds off the hub, 1 for each pc. 2) Will it automatically connect up and not mess all my connections up again. 3) I know the hub will need to be on all the time, but id rather that than leaving my pc on. By the way both machines have windosw XP on, i get my internet from NTL 2mb broadband through a set top box, which goes from ethernet connection to a usb cable and plugs into a port on the front. I hope i have given enough information, if not please ask whatever is necessary.

  01chris 20:59 25 Apr 2005

just buy a router and connect both pc's to the router using standard lan cable. (routers are similar to hubs but they provide a net connection as well).

  conquistador 21:02 25 Apr 2005

thanks 01chris, but i already get my internet from the set top box, so why would i need a router?.

  mgmcc 23:47 25 Apr 2005

<<< i already get my internet from the set top box, so why would i need a router?. >>>

Because otherwise only one PC can connect to the internet. The ISP only allocates one IP address and each PC requires a unique IP address. At the moment your "host" PC has Internet Connection Sharing enabled, which means it is actually acting as a "router" so that the client PC gets a LAN IP address (in the range 192.168.xxx.xxx) and its internet access over the network from the "host".

For both PCs to have independent internet access, without one having to rely on a "host", you need a separate router. If you connect with only a basic hub/switch, only the first PC to connect to the modem will get an IP address and be able to access the internet.

With a router, it gets the IP address from the ISP and all PCs connected to it are allocated LAN IP addresses.

  conquistador 20:20 26 Apr 2005

Thx mgmcc, you explained that very clearly, now my only question is Will NTL charge me for a second ip address?.

  conquistador 21:38 26 Apr 2005

I dont quite understand why i need a modem router when i have set top box internet, Is my connection dsl adsl ? whats the difference?.Any help would be appreciated
Thanks

  toern 01:16 27 Apr 2005

NTL is similar to my Telewest

(is Telewest about to take over NTL or vice versa? Telewest went bankrupt last july, and was tken over by Telewest global of delaware, and taken off the London stock exchange)

You pay for 1 connection. Telewest or NTL sees the number of your original PC. The router pretends it is that number, but you can plug several PC's into it.

  mgmcc 14:59 27 Apr 2005

<< now my only question is Will NTL charge me for a second ip address?. >>

You only get one IP address from the ISP and that is allocated to the ROUTER, not to an individual PC. The router then allocates LAN (Local Area Network) IP addresses to each of the PCs that connect to it. It then ROUTES the relevant internet traffic to the appropriate PC in the network.

<< I dont quite understand why i need a modem router when i have set top box internet >>

You do NOT need a combined modem/router, that is for use with ADSL broadband. You want what is generally descibed as a Cable/DSL router, which doesn't have a modem on board and can be used with either Cable or DSL in conjunction with a separate modem that supports an ethernet connection.

<< Is my connection dsl adsl >>

No, it is cable. DSL is the broadband system used in conjunction with the phone line and stands for Digital Subscriber Line. In the UK, almost all DSL connections are "Assymetric" (Upload and Download speeds are different), hence ADSL.

  mgmcc 15:00 27 Apr 2005

Sorry, mis-typed "Asymmetric"!

  conquistador 20:06 27 Apr 2005

Thx everyone for your help

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