Long Time Problem With Packet Loss

  RizlaUK 01:54 07 Mar 2019

Hi,

I have a very annoying problem that has been going on for some time. I'm hoping to finally nail it down once and for all. I have a intermittent fault with packet loss. Once it occurs, i can't browse web pages, play online games or use VOIP services. Then after sometimes a day of trying to fix the problem, i decide to give up - go back to the PC and it's gone for sometimes up to 2-3 months - but it always comes back.

Here is a list of things that i have done or replaced in an attempt to fix it;

  1. Replaced router (3 times, 2 third party followed by the suppliers recommended one).
  2. Replaced all ethernet cables
  3. Installed a PCI-e ethernet card
  4. Reformatted Windows many times
  5. Tried different drivers
  6. Changed ISP (from copper broadband to fibre optic)

So i was hoping somebody could shed some light on this and maybe guide me a little.

Here are my specs;

Computer: ASUS All Series CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K (Haswell-DT Refresh, C0) 4000 MHz (40.00x100.0) @ 1899 MHz (19.00x100.0) Motherboard: ASUS MAXIMUS VII GENE BIOS: 3003, 10/28/2015 Chipset: Intel Z97 Memory: 16384 MBytes @ 799 MHz, 11-11-11-28 - 8192 MB PC19200 DDR3 SDRAM - Kingston KHX2400C11D3/8GX - 8192 MB PC19200 DDR3 SDRAM - Kingston KHX2400C11D3/8GX Graphics: ASUS STRIX GTX 980 DirectCU II OC NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980, 4096 MB GDDR5 SDRAM Graphics: ASUS STRIX GTX 980 DirectCU II OC NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980, 4096 MB GDDR5 SDRAM Drive: Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500GB, 488.4 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s Drive: ST3000DM001-1ER166, 2930.3 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s Drive: PIONEER BD-ROM BDC-207D, BD-ROM Sound: Intel 9-series Chipset - High Definition Audio Controller [A0] Sound: NVIDIA GM204 - High Definition Audio Controller Sound: NVIDIA GM204 - High Definition Audio Controller Network: Intel Ethernet Connection I218-V Network: RealTek Semiconductor RTL8168/8111 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet NIC OS: Microsoft Windows 10 Home (x64) Build 17134.619 (1803/RS4)

Thanks a lot.

Rizla

  Bris 20:36 07 Mar 2019

The next time it happens log into your router and navigate to advanced settings and look for PING then issue the command PING www.google.com -n 20. You should get 20 packets returned with no loss. If there are lost packets then the problem is between your router and ISP.

If no lost packets then on the PC go into command entry and issue the same PING command. If you get lost packets then the problem is between the PC and router.

You can increase the number from 20 but its best to keep these test to a minimum as the Google server may object to you bombarding it with pings.

  Bris 20:47 07 Mar 2019

A further thought. You can ping your router as above as many times as you like so the next time packet loss happens, ping your router and if you get lost packets then its the connection between your PC and router.

If you need help with finding the address of your router then post back.

  RizlaUK 21:28 07 Mar 2019

Hi Bris - thanks for the reply and advice.

Here is a capture of 10 pings of my router (no packets lost) and also 10 pings to www.google.com (with 30% packet loss).

  RizlaUK 21:29 07 Mar 2019

  RizlaUK 21:33 07 Mar 2019

I won't let me upload the capture so here is is the text copy and pasted,

Router: Pinging 192.168.0.1 with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64

Google: Pinging www.google.com [216.58.201.4] with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=30ms TTL=53 Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=53 Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=53 Request timed out. Request timed out. Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=34ms TTL=53 Request timed out. Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=34ms TTL=53 Request timed out. Request timed out. Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=33ms TTL=53 Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53 Request timed out. Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=53 Request timed out. Request timed out. Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53 Reply from 216.58.201.4: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=53

  RizlaUK 22:45 07 Mar 2019

Another thing i've noticed. All browsers now try to use https by default. I don't think that is default behaviour, so maybe that is something to do with it.

  Bris 19:31 08 Mar 2019

Certainly the 30% loss is not normal.

Did you ping google from the router?

Your comment about HTTPS is not really relevant in this scenario as PING is a low level operation that is outside the realms of browsers however please keep the comments and ideas coming.

From what has been discovered so far the problem seems to be between your router and ISP, that is a line problem. Packet loss often occurs when you are connected to a server in another country as the path can become quite tortuous, however, I assume that the Google servers you are pinging are in the UK.

In your original post you said that you changed from copper to fibre. Was this fibre to your property or to the nearest exchange. In the case of the latter its possible that some of the existing copper wires are still being used.

I will investigate further but my time is limited so may not be able to get back quickly.

  RizlaUK 22:37 08 Mar 2019

Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I think i may have found the culprit. I had a TP Link powerline adaptor that run an ethernet connection from my router to my sons room upstairs. When removing them, my connection came back to life. Since having them removed, i've been experiencing 0% packet loss over the last few hours. I'm hoping that is finally it. I'll post again if the problem comes back.

Thanks for your help and time.

Regards

  Forum Editor 16:43 09 Mar 2019

KEITH 1955

Someone who doesn't know why browsers look for https/ urls isn't as clever as you might think.

Half the planet knows why that happens.

  RizlaUK 16:56 09 Mar 2019

Keith,

I do apologise for coming onto a tech help forum and posing a legitimate question. Believe it or not, but pc savvy people do sometimes have problems that they can't solve and then, like others, take their questions to forums. I understand perfectly what the https protocol is and why it's used, i stated that i wasn't sure if ALL websites used that as default. The only thing 'funny' going on here is your wierd sense of paranoia!

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