Internet connection

  Skinn 20:37 17 Mar 2005
Locked

I am buying a new house and the electrician has asked me if I want a CAT 5E or 6 computer socket. I really don’t know what this means! I want to use broadband for Internet access and will have an additional PC, which I may want to connect with my main PC at some time in the future.

Will a standard telephone cable and sockets be sufficient for broadband connection and possible linking with another PC in the future? If not what should I be asking for?

I run 3 pcs via broadband in my house with the normal plug-in telephone sockets and running 2MB service with AOL all running great

  Technotiger 20:41 17 Mar 2005

Hi, CAT are high quality shielded cables/fittings.
Not essential for Internet, but not a bad thing either .


Cheers.

  Skinn 20:51 17 Mar 2005

"CAT are high quality shielded cables/fittings"

Please could you explain this? How much extra over should I expect to pay for CAT?

  Technotiger 20:58 17 Mar 2005

Sorry, don't know prices, just that quality is better/best.

  Jackcoms 21:09 17 Mar 2005

Wouldn't it have been easier to ask the electrician exactly what he is offering you and why?

  y_not 21:50 17 Mar 2005

Given the price of wireless cards would it not be cheaper (and neater) to spend the money on a wireless setup instead of wired?

Bits of copper spread around the house are not the way forward.

  lotvic 00:05 18 Mar 2005

"Will a standard telephone cable and sockets be sufficient for broadband connection and possible linking with another PC in the future?"

yes
click here for a picture guide of that setup

  Skinn 00:21 18 Mar 2005

"Wouldn't it have been easier to ask the electrician exactly what he is offering you and why?"

He didn't know - it is just that someone else had asked for it.

"Given the price of wireless cards would it not be cheaper (and neater) to spend the money on a wireless setup instead of wired?"

So, if the other PC is upstairs at the other end of the house, would I be better off connecting them wirelessly rather than wired?
If I did want to go down the wired route,what provision should I ask to be made?

  EdFrench 00:58 18 Mar 2005

I would certainly go for the wireless option. Labour costs being what they are, why pay that when you can pay a 'one off' fee for the technology and avoid the disturbance that knocking your home about will cause?

  y_not 06:44 19 Mar 2005

Network cards in both/all PC's and (about £20 each) and a router (about £60) gives you high speed connectivity AND can be expanded if you decide to add extra PC's in the future.

For wired you'll need a cross-over cable (if you only connect the two) a hub if you want to add extra PC's later and cat5 cable from wherever the hub is sited to both PC's, Oh one other thing, the hub needs a power supply.

Would still recommend wireless for the flexibility, portability (difficult dragging cable down the garden to play on a laptop) and neatness.

Tony

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