Gas legislation pipe fittings in a wall

  Barry Phillips 15:14 29 Oct 2018

Can you advise me if its legal to have a gas connection located within a cavity wall? or just good practice not to have a joint in the wall?

Can a service be shut down if a gas pipe fitting is located in the wall if it is not leaking?

  MJS WARLORD 15:59 29 Oct 2018

First of all I would not recommend putting a pipe connection in a cavity wall ,if you get a leak you will get a lot of gas in your cavity wall before you smell it or before your house goes BOOOM !

Secondly the gas company has the power to seal anything they don't like the look of weather it is leaking or not , this is not just for your protection but because a gas explosion can wipe out your neighbour's as well as yourself.

Many years ago when I had my gas boiler serviced I kept getting told my cooker fan was too close to the boiler flue so I was told to move it , this went on for about 5 years because I said it was their responsibility to tell me where to move it to otherwise they could come back next year and say it was still in the wrong place. There was no way I was going to keep making holes in the wall until they said it was right !

  canarieslover 16:44 29 Oct 2018

I live on an estate of around 700 houses built in the early 50's. All the gas piping coming through the house and distribution around was all either underfloor or in the walls. My parents house which was built immedieately post war is serviced in the same way. It was all iron pipe with threaded joints. Our house had a minor leak detected when we had the changeover to natural gas so I had it sealed off and new wall mounted copper pipework installed. I found out that the joints were threaded joints as I started making improvements to the house and exposed the old piping. I don't know how many of the other houses have had there piping replaced but obviously in the walls and floor was common practice back in 50' / 60's.

  MJS WARLORD 18:04 29 Oct 2018

never knew gas pipes were buried in old house walls , thank god my parents never put nails in the walls to hang pictures BOOOOOOOOM

  Forum Editor 18:47 29 Oct 2018

Gas pipes may pass through a cavity wall provided they run inside a suitable gas tight duct. There must not be any mechanical joints in the section which passes through the wall, and it is good practice not to have any soldered joints.

Under no circumstances must you use the cavity to run gas pipes vertically or horizontally. If you cannot run gas pipes vertically inside an enclosed fireproof duct you must run them on the outside wall of the building.

You must not install any part of any gas pipework in a solid wall or floor unless it is installed in such a way that it is protected against failure caused by any movement of the wall or floor. In practice this can be achieved by building gas-tight ducts into the structure, but it's much easier to run the pipes in corners and construct fireproof ducts around them. These ducts must have fire-breaks built into them between floors, so that a fire cannot use the duct as a chimney through which it can travel up the building from floor to floor.

You must always get a registered Gas-Safe installer to do this kind of work.

  BT 09:02 30 Oct 2018

When they had to replace my supply pipe from the street to the meter due to a leak at the street end they also removed the meter to an outside cabinet as they said that this was the normal practise now. They passed new copper pipework through the wall and connected to the old indoor pipework which is embedded within inside walls and floors.

Over the last few weeks they have been replacing street gas mains locally including supply pipes but have only been moving meters out to outdoor cabinets on a very few properties. Watching the work being done it appears to me that they have been installing the new plastic supply pipes as a liner within the old metal pipes and connecting to the existing pipework before it enters the premises. Compared with how mine was done a few years ago it seems to be a bit of botch job, probably done in an approved way none the less. Our gas was disconnected for a whole day and we had to wait for a Gas Safe engineer to turn it back on again.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 12:37 30 Oct 2018

My gas supply was "relined" the same way a few years ago but they did not renew or move the meter.

  Forum Editor 14:18 30 Oct 2018

Wherever possible, new gas supply pipes to meters will be run inside existing underground iron pipes using yellow MDPE plastic. It's much faster and neater to do it that way because it doesn't involve digging up driveways or gardens.

Meters are being fitted in external wall mounted boxes for obvious reasons - the meter can be read without anyone having to be in. They don't look so great, and you don't have to agree to it if your existing meter is reasonably accessible - I recently had a gas leak under my driveway, and a new supply pipe had to be fitted up to the meter. I specifically asked that no external wallbox was fitted, so they ran the new pipe under the floor of the house and connected it to the existing meter under the stairs.

"They passed new copper pipework through the wall and connected to the old indoor pipework which is embedded within inside walls and floors."

Piping within the building (after the meter) is the responsibility of the householder. If there's a report of a gas leak within the building, the gas supply will be turned off at the meter and a warning notice affixed until the householder gets the leak fixed.

  BT 17:38 30 Oct 2018

Wherever possible, new gas supply pipes to meters will be run inside existing underground iron pipes using yellow MDPE plastic. It's much faster and neater to do it that way because it doesn't involve digging up driveways or gardens.

This is obviously a different way of doing it now. When my supply pipe was replaced it was run up my driveway alongside the existing pipe using a hydraulic 'mole' between a couple of small holes that they dug. It wasn't lined inside the old pipe as the gas was only disconnected for a short time while the connections were changed over at each end.The installation of the meter outside wasn't optional. We were told that at the time that it was being done at all repair/installations.

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