Couple of questions re fitting a second hard drive

  emmandelo1 18:53 30 Jul 2003
Locked

Hi all
I currently have winXP pro and have a 40GB Maxtor HDD. I'm looking to installing a second hard drive. Never done it before but you gotta start sometime...! My 40GB is split into four 10GB partitions, C,D,E and F. I also have a DVD drive and a DVD RW drive, G and H. The second hard drive will probably be a Maxtor 60GB which I want to partition into a 30GB and 3x10GB.Am I right in assuming that Maxtor drives come with software that will allow me to partition it so. Also what happens to drives G and H? Do they stay as G and H or would they become K and L and if so would progs like Nero automatically detect the drive letter change? Cheers.

  Brian-336451 19:15 30 Jul 2003

Technically there is absolutely no problem with what you propose.

Personally, I use Partition Magic to firstly create the partitions and then it allows you to actually choose the drive letters you want for the particular partitions.

It will even run software to trawl through your computer changing the 'old' drive letter to the 'new' one.

I'm not sure what software comes with a Maxtor drive these days (I too am using two Maxtor drives but only 30/20Gb - can you imagine saying 'only' five years ago?)

Maxtor drives certainly used to come with Maxblast on them to allow partitioning and they still talk about the latest version on the Maxtor web site, so presumably they do.

What I reckon is, without intervention, all the drive letters will shift 'to the right'.

Still, not sure about that. PM can definitely sort it out for you though.

Nero only detects the letters assigned by the Operating System, but will pick out the CD/DVD drives.

  emmandelo1 19:21 30 Jul 2003

Thanks Not THAT Brian May. i have PM8 but as yet have not installed it. (No need for it up to now..) From what you say it sounds like PM8 will do more for me than Maxblast will.

  spikeychris 19:27 30 Jul 2003

As NTBM says XP will just shove the drive letters along, you can however change the drive to whatever letter you want.

Apart from the drive that has the swapfile on just Right-click My Computer, and then click Manage.


Under Computer Management, click Disk Management. In the right pane, you?ll see your drives listed. CD-ROM drives are listed at the bottom of the pane.


Right-click the drive or device you want to change, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.


Click Change, click Assign the following drive letter, click the drive letter you want to assign, and then click OK.

Chris

  THE TERMINATOR 19:28 30 Jul 2003

The computer reads your drives in the order FLOPPY-FLOPPY-HDD-HDD-DVD-DVDrw. Therefore you are right in assuming that your dvd and dvdrw drives will change to K & L as this is what happened to me.

  emmandelo1 19:35 30 Jul 2003

Even easier spikeychris. Thanx for that. As I've never tackled installing a hard drive before it looks like my concerns over drive letters are going to be the least of my worries.

  emmandelo1 19:37 30 Jul 2003

thanks TT. I'll mark this as resolved for now. Will return with new post when installation doesn't go as planned. (forever the pessimist..)
Cheers

  THE TERMINATOR 19:39 30 Jul 2003

Although Spikeychris is right, PM8 is the king when it comes to partitioning your drive, it can also change your drive letters to how you want them

  Brian-336451 09:01 31 Jul 2003

Personally, I have made my data partitions Y: and Z:

The CD and CD/RW could easily be moved down to say W: and X:.

This then gives you free rein to create and destroy partitions without mucking up your data paths and installation paths for your applications.

By the way, just 'cos I do it doesn't make it right, it just suits me not to confuse the confuser (so to speak)!

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