Supanet charge for MAC code

  Bailey08787 10:17 16 Feb 2007
Locked

Hi

I'm looking to leave Supanet with whom I've been with for over two years (so the minimum terms have long since expired).

So I call up to ask for my MAC code, but they won't give it me without charging me a £50 admin fee.

Is this normal??

  Bailey08787 16:35 19 Feb 2007

"I'm afraid this is a cancellation fee imposed by Supanet, which is pretty standard. Whilst this is not a charge to get your MAC code (which is now illegal under the new MAC code regulation) it's a stealth charge of sorts to any customers wanting to move to a new provider.

You can still get your MAC code for free but it seems likely you will have to pay the cancellation fee too."


Unbelievable. Its like a pc vendor saying "hey, have a pc for free!!! (there's just a £1,200 admin charge).

It sounds akin to one of those dodgy scams coming out of Africa.

  Bailey08787 17:34 19 Feb 2007

I'm afraid this is a cancellation fee imposed by Supanet, which is pretty standard. Whilst this is not a charge to get your MAC code (which is now illegal under the new MAC code regulation) it's a stealth charge of sorts to any customers wanting to move to a new provider.

You can still get your MAC code for free but it seems likely you will have to pay the cancellation fee too.

Cheers

Jason

Bailey08787
Jason you describe it as a cancellation fee - but i'm not looking to cancel the line - just migrate from one ISP to another. Supanet have already told me that I can cancel the line without incurring any extra charge (but will have to go without broadband for about a month whilst they cancel the line and the new one gets set up). So I don't understand where this cancellation fee comes in, if they've told me I can cancel for free. It seems the cancellation fee only comes in when I'm not actually cancelling my line, but am in fact requesting a MAC code.

Now to me that just doesn't stack up

  TOPCAT® 21:07 19 Feb 2007

broadband customers? If your minimum term (contract length) has passed then no charge is necessary for a cancellation anyway. They do say they need at least one month's notice to cancel. Check out chapter 14 of the pdf T&Cs for details. No mention I can see about migrating away from them, only to them. TC.


click here

  Forum Editor 23:00 19 Feb 2007

for issuing a MAC code, no matter what they may believe to the contrary. Neither may they legally charge you any kind of a fee if you issue them with a month's notice of your intention to cancel the contract. This is not 'pretty standard' at all, and there's no justification for it. Charging a £50 'admin' fee - if that's what they call it - is outrageous.

Some people might say that Supanet are threatening you with a £50 charge in the hope that you'll decide to stay with them, and that they are being deliberately obstructive for the same reason. I have no way of knowing if that's the case or not, but if it did turn out to be true I would want the company to receive the maximum amount of bad publicity.

  Bailey08787 09:58 20 Feb 2007

Well, if it is Supanet's motive to prolong my subscription, then its certainly working.

I'm not going to pay them £50 to obtain my MAC - and I cannot afford (businesswise) to cancel my line and go without broadband for a month.

It's all well and good stating that it is illegal for Supanet to withold my MAC - but I'm stuck as to what I can do next?

Customer service staff at Supanet simply say that it is their policy to charge £50. When I raise the fact they are breaking the law, they tell me they are not authorised to discuss the matter and end the conversation.

I have sent numerous emails to Supanet. I have sent a physical letter of complaint to Supanet.

I know I have the option of cancelling my line without incurring any charge, but that will mean I have to go without internet for a month.

I have contacted Ofcom who said that the next stage was for me to write a letter of complaint to Supanet, who will have up to 12 weeks to respond - great.

Ofcom said they will consider investigating if they receive enough complaints against Supanet - but in terms of when some kind of resolution will be reached, its how long is a piece of string.

Therefore, as originally stated, if its Supanet's aim to prolong my subscription, they have succeeded.

I just hope they suffer through all the negative publicity (if any) it generates.

  Arnie 10:19 20 Feb 2007

The longer I live in this country, 70+years, the more I despair.

What with this I have just read, the 0870/1 rip-offs, and numerous stealth taxes imposed, when will it all end?

  TOPCAT® 13:42 20 Feb 2007

you to get in touch with their local Trading Standards Office. They may be able to move much quicker on it for you, because if Supanet are indeed breaking the law then they should act on your behalf and let you know the outcome. Hope you get this sorted out soon. TC.

click here

Their local TS office: click here

  Bailey08787 15:52 20 Feb 2007

thought I'd post this for any Supanet sufferers in the same boat as me....(last paragraph the most depressing) click here

ADSL switching rules too little too late

Getting a MAC code so you can switch internet providers could remain a drawn out, desperate and despairing process for users if the small print is anything to go by.

The welcome news that Ofcom is making ISPs provide MAC codes free and compulsory is too late for people affected by the E7even scandal and disgruntled customers like me - I had to pay PlusNet £84 for my MAC.

Anyone who's had dealings with regulators like Ofcom and Ofwat may have some scepticism and I wanted to see what kind of teeth Ofcom claims now to have.

ISPs have five days to issue MAC codes to customers. But how long could it really take?

Simon Bates from the regulator told me "if there is any evidence a company has broken the rules" Ofcom would do the following things in the following order:

issue the company with a warning
ask it to remedy the situation
possibly request that it pay refunds to the customer
Finally, should all else fail it would issue a fine of up to 10 per cent of the company's turnover to the naughty ISP.

But, to the crux of the matter, how long does it take Ofcom to deal with unfulfilled MAC requests? Bates said it hopes to close any investigation into ISPs breaking the rules "within six months of opening it". So even if Ofcom does have some balls, it's still a fat bureaucracy…

  Bailey08787 10:20 28 Feb 2007

Last week, I felt that despite all the new Ofcom rules, it did not look like Supanet were going to relax their defiant stance and give in.

So, to save myself a lot of seemingly futile raving and rantings, I decided to concede defeat, and just ask for the line to be cancelled - which will mean I will have to do without broadband for several weeks.

Today is the day the line is due to cease.

and now, Supanet decide to do an about turn and start issuing MAC codes for free - but as my line cancellation is being processed, its too late for me to get one.

jesus wept.

(feel v.sorry for anyone who gave them £50 for their MAC code in the last few weeks).

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Elsewhere on IDG sites

OnePlus 7T Pro review

Kristina Bold is a font based on a stroke survivor's handwriting

The best games on Apple Arcade

Les meilleures séries Netflix (2019)