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Problem Regarding to Windows Partition on Mac

  KD James 09:58 30 Nov 2019
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I tried to download windows partition on Mac but it says "The windows support software could not be saved to the selected drive". What is meant by the selected drive? How to solve this problem?

  HondaMan 13:26 30 Nov 2019

If you want to run Windows (any version) on a Mac, you will need virtualisation software such as Parallels Desktop. I think version 15 is the latest, or dive into Boot Camp which is already on your Mac

  Kestion 11:20 20 Feb 2020

Booting a computer is a complex process; it starts with the motherboard trying to see if there is anything bootable out there, and it builds several (I think around 5) layers up from there — each more high-level and complex than the one before.
Part of this system is on the hard disk. We are now working downwards from (near) the top. There is the partition you see, with the OS and your files… and below that there is a small partition with information particular to launching that OS… and below that there is a boot sector (which the level below has to expect and understand). I am guessing that this is what it means by “Windows support software”. […Or I might have totally misunderstood the whole scenario.]
Presumably, you were doing the copy with higher-level software that understands booting Windows, as opposed to just blindly copying the contents of a partition. [Again, I am extrapolating.]
Your immediate problem (I am guessing) is either • that the drive is just the wrong format (e.g. HFS+ instead of NTFS) for writing (correctly) the small, earlier partitions, or that • there is an OS launch partition already, and it would have to over-write that.

If you want to be able to boot Windows, the best option is to get another drive and set it up on that. To use the existing drive, you have to back up everything, re-format the drive as required, and set it up from the ground up with both. (This might require various levels of knowledge about which OS plays the most fairly; basically, Windows likes to destroy anything it does not understand, so you put it on last. Search “dual-boot” or “triple-boot”.)
Actually, Apple supplies Boot Camp to do all the hard work for you… although that expects you to install Windows fresh on the partition it provides for that, which might not suit you.

If you just want a copy of the partition contents — the files — then ideally all you need is room to copy the files. However, it sounds as though you want to copy the partition. For that, all you need is a spare partition (and priorly room for a spare partition). As per the above… you need some software that is happy to just copy the specified partition. (Search “clone”, if your existing software will not do what you want.) As per the above… this will not make it bootable.

Back to booting Windows…
I hate to disagree with HondaMan; he [presumably!] seems to be thinking of having them both running at the same time; he is correct for that, but there is also the dual-boot option — which means rebooting and only having one at a time. • It is trivial to (delete the MacOS and) install Windows on a Mac; to Windows, it is just another PC. Dual-boot I have discussed. • It is immediately not possible to install (so that it works) MacOS on a PC; that requires hacking (and the ethical question); hence “Hackintosh”. If you can get a Hackintosh running, you will have little additional trouble making it dual-boot Windows. • As HondaMan says, you can use virtualisation software to run a second OS from with a first one. Again, Apple does not want MacOS running on a PC, so that requires hacking (and the ethical question). Running Windows from within MacOS is easy enough; as mentioned, Parallels Desktop is one option.

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