For example, you can select a street address in an email or text document, and use CTRL-C to copy it to the clipboard. As soon as you do, Click.to pops up and allows you to send it directly to Google Maps - no need to go to your browser, go to maps, and then paste in the text.

Although Click.to rarely presumes to tell you what to do with what you've copied, it's smart enough not to offer impossible options; you can't send a copied bitmap image to Google Maps or search for it on Amazon, for example. Beyond that, it's got a lot of built-in support for the most common applications and functions, including eBay, Excel, Facebook, spellchecking, and Word.. Because Click.to hooks into the standard clipboard routines, there's no need to remember to invoke it using a special key combination--if you "copy," and the data type is something it can handle, it will be there. See all: PC Advisor software downloads

Click.to offers more possible functions than can conveniently fit on the screen when you copy some data, so only a handful are shown instantly. Click.to calls these "satellites", because they hover above the cursor. The rest of the options are invoked from a drop-down menu which is part of the satellite row. It is trivially easy to change which functions are shown always and which are secondary, via the interface; it doesn't learn your habits.

It is also possible to create your own functions for Click.to. If you use a search engine or other Web tool which is not built-in to Click.to's list, you can specify the web site string to use. You can also add links to applications, provided you're familiar with the syntax the application uses to launch itself with associated content as a parameter. This may take some research, as it's not a commonly used aspect of most apps, though it is widely supported. The on-line help takes you through this process, step-by-step, for both "Web Actions" and "Windows Actions".

One feature I really wanted was missing, and that was an easy way to keep appending selected items to the same document. There is a feature in Click.to which will let you go back to a target document and the manually paste, but there isn't a "paste to last with CR" function. Click.to's designer attributed this to the fact it wasn't easy to determine the desired paste location automatically, but "Paste At Insertion Point," "Paste At End," etc, should be relatively simple to add.

That's a bit of a quibble, though, given that click.to is freeware. It's also important to note that while there are browser tools such as KwiClick or Apture Highlights that offer some similar functionality, Click.to is not a browser plugin, but a Windows tool, so it integrates fully with all of your applications.

Click.to: Specs

  • Microsoft Windows 7, Microsoft Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows XP
  • Microsoft Windows 7, Microsoft Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows XP

OUR VERDICT

Click.To quickly sends your copied text to a myriad of applications.