The Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t is a netbook with a multitouch touchscreen.

IdeaPad S10-3t as a netbook

Other than the touchscreen, the Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t has standard specifications. It has an Intel Atom N450 CPU with a built-in graphics adaptor, Hyper-Threading and a frequency of 1.66GHz; there is 1GB of DDR2 SDRAM installed, as well as a 250GB Seagate Momentus (ST9250315AS) hard drive. You get Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11n Wi-Fi, D-sub, microphone and headphone ports, but only two USB 2.0 ports.

The Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t recorded a time of 6min 58sec in our Blender 3D test, 8min 8sec in our iTunes MP3 encoding test and 24.65 megabytes per second in our hard drive transfer test. The iTunes and Blender results stack up well against the previous Lenovo netbook we tested - the IdeaPad S10-2. The hard drive transfer speed is a little below what we expected.

When you aren't using the Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t in tablet mode, it offers adequate performance when browsing the web, typing documents and watching movies. It runs just like a regular netbook in that regard. It's mostly when you try to use it as a tablet PC than the system slows down to a crawl and you feel like hurling it with all your might at double-brick wall.

The keyboard is one of the best we've used on a netbook, as the keys have plenty of travel and bounce-back, but there is a very small palm rest and touchpad due to the inclusion of the large hinge for the touchscreen. The webcam is also placed in an awkward position to the right of the screen. If you are sitting in front of the netbook while using Skype, for example, your face will be out of the frame.

Ideapad S10-3t battery life

The Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t has a 68 Watt-hour battery on its spine that can double as a grip when you are in tablet mode. Next to the great keyboard, it's the IdeaPad S10-3t's best feature. It gives it plenty of life on the road, but it also makes the netbook heavier than usual - it weighs in at 1.45kg. In our rundown test, where we disable power management, enable Wi-Fi, turn up the brightness and loop an Xvid-encoded video, the battery lasted a total of 5hr 5min. This is slightly less than the most recent endurance champ, the HP Mini 210, which lasted 5hr 11min in the same test, even though it has a 62 Watt-hour battery. If you'll be using the netbook in tablet mode then the battery will last significantly less as the CPU will be doing more work than it does when you just watch a video.

NEXT: our expert verdict >>

Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t: Specs

  • 1.66GHz Intel Atom 1GB DDR2 RAM
  • 10.1in TFT touchscreen, 1024x600
  • 250GB 5400rpm, Secure Digital (SD)
  • Finger Operated Touchscreen, Touchpad, Buttons, Keyboard
  • Built-in Microphone, Camera
  • Slot For Cable Lock, Tablet Form Factor, Convertible, Power Supply
  • D-Sub, Headphone Jack, Microphone Jack, RJ45, USB 2.0
  • Wireless 802.11n, Bluetooth, Wireless 802.11b, Wireless 802.11g
  • rechargeable Li-Ion battery
  • 1.66GHz Intel Atom 1GB DDR2 RAM
  • 10.1in TFT touchscreen, 1024x600
  • 250GB 5400rpm, Secure Digital (SD)
  • Finger Operated Touchscreen, Touchpad, Buttons, Keyboard
  • Built-in Microphone, Camera
  • Slot For Cable Lock, Tablet Form Factor, Convertible, Power Supply
  • D-Sub, Headphone Jack, Microphone Jack, RJ45, USB 2.0
  • Wireless 802.11n, Bluetooth, Wireless 802.11b, Wireless 802.11g
  • rechargeable Li-Ion battery

OUR VERDICT

Overall, the Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t seems more of a proof of concept than anything else. As a tablet, it’s not fun to use and it will have a negative impact on your productivity. Things could be better if Windows 7 Home Premium was installed, but the hardware also needs some tweaking. A screen with edge-to-edge glass would make scrolling a lot more comfortable and responsive; a trimmed-down hinge design would probably allow for a deeper palm rest and larger touchpad; and a webcam at the centre of the screen would make it possible to use the netbook for video conferencing. It’s clear that netbooks with touchscreens aren’t prime-time material yet.