Snapchat is a hugely popular photo-sharing service that allows users to send pictures and videos to friends and family that expire after a maximum of 10 seconds. While this means that users could send ugly/funny/sometimes inappropriate photos without any ramification (or so they thought), Snapchat can’t stop people from screenshotting photos on their smartphones. Read next: How to use Snapchat (including Filters)

However, it seems that the developers planned for that eventuality and built a system that notifies the sender whenever their snaps have been screenshotted. Here, we show you how to screenshot a snapchat without the sender knowing. 

Also see: What are Snapchat Spectacles? and Snapchat Spectacles review.

The original methods no longer work

While we originally found a method of being able to screenshot Snapchats by using Airplane mode and force-quitting apps before the app could notify the sender, the method no longer works. While you can still put your iPhone on Airplane mode and screenshot a loaded Snapchat, once you re-open the app (could be minutes or days after) it'll notify the sender that a screenshot has been taken - you can't avoid it any more!

Our second suggestion was to use a third-party app that offered the ability to stealthily save incoming snaps, but after Snapchat’s hack back in October 2014, Snapchat made the decision to up the security of its API and as a result, killed many third-party Snapchat apps. There were still a handful floating around on the App Store until recently, like Sneakaboo, but it seems even those aren't available any more. 

So, what else is there to do? While they aren't the most straight-forward options available and do require a bit of planning, there are a handful of other ways to screenshot incoming Snapchats without the sender knowing. 

Read next: Best Snapchat tips and tricks

Use another phone

While it might not be the most technical solution to the problem, if you're desperate to preserve an incoming Snapchat for whatever reason, use your tablet or a friend's smartphone to record the snap as you open it. 

The reason we say record instead of photograph is because prior to opening the Snap, you don't know how long it is - if it's a one second long snap, it'll finish before you can hit the capture button. At least with a video you can screenshot the part you want to save afterwards, although the quality won't be as good as if it were screenshotted on the original phone of course. 

Use QuickTime and a Mac

This method requires a bit more preparation than quickly grabbing a spare phone or tablet to photograph your display, but will provide users with high-quality screenshots without notifying the sender. How? Using a Mac, connect your iPhone using a certified Lightning cable (it must support data transfer) and open QuickTime player.

Once opened, select File > New Movie Recording in the menu bar. Once the screen loads up, hover your mouse near the Record button and a small arrow should appear - click that. Clicking the arrow should reveal different recording options including your iPhone - select your iPhone as your camera input and your iPhone display should appear on-screen within seconds.

From here, you need only hit record, open Snapchat and open all the snaps you'd like to save. Once complete, save the recorded video and screenshot the video on your Mac (SHIFT + CMD + 4) to save high-quality snaps without the sender being aware. 

Unfortunately, Android fans are out of luck with this one as it's an iOS-only feature, but there are a number of Android-mirroring apps available (like Mirror for Android) that achieve a similar result. 

Read next: How to update Snapchat on iOS and Android