ReadyBoost questions

  Pineman100 11:56 26 Dec 2008
Locked

My wife's laptop runs Vista Home premium. It only has 1GB of memory, so I thought I would try a USB flash drive to see whether Microsoft's claims for ReadyBoost were really true.

I bought an unbranded 4GB flashdrive, but when I plugged this in and tried to set it up for ReadyBoost, the computer reported that the drive was unsuitable for this function. Fortunately, I already had another, better quality 1GB flash drive (Buffalo brand), that I store files on, so I transferred these files to the new drive and set up the 1GB drive for ReadyBoost on my wife's computer. And it does seem to have brought some improvement in performance.

That's the background - here are my two questions:

1. Why was the unbranded drive not suitable for ReadyBoost? What is it about a good quality drive that makes it better than a cheap drive?

2. ReadyBoost reported that it has set aside 890MB of the 1GB drive for its function. Does this mean that 890MB is the maximum flash drive space that my wife's computer can use for ReadyBoost, no matter how big the flash drive is?

If so, then I presume there's no point in my buying a larger good-quality drive in the hope of boosting the computer's performance still further?

  User-1229748 12:24 26 Dec 2008

this should explain better than meclick here

  Pineman100 12:39 26 Dec 2008

That's useful information, although I'm still not quite clear on a couple of points:

1. The Wikipedia article says thet "250 MB to 4 GB of flash memory can be assigned" to ReadyBoost.

But that's a generalised statement. I wonder whether the optimum amount of flash memory for ReadyBoost varies from computer to computer (depending on each machine's individual hardware spec).

What I'm trying to decide is whether to spend money on a larger, good-quality flash drive. I only want to do this if it would add even more benefit to my wife's laptop.

It would be a waste of money if ReadyBoost would still grab only 890MB from the larger drive.

  Pineman100 12:42 26 Dec 2008

.
2. How do I know whether a USB flash drive is good enough for ReadyBoost? I suppose the easy answer is just to go for a known brand, but can I be completely confident that a brand like, say, Crucial would definitely be suitable?

  mooly 12:54 26 Dec 2008

You may be interested in both this,
click here

  mooly 12:57 26 Dec 2008

And this,
click here

Upgrading the RAM was so easy, and the results so very impressive I would seriously suggest you consider doing the same.
The difference has been absolutely amazing.

  User-1229748 13:34 26 Dec 2008

found this click here

  Pineman100 14:06 26 Dec 2008

.
Firstly on the question of ReadyBoost, I remember reading your earlier post, and I have read other reports on it - good and bad. However, as I said above, it does seem to have had a beneficial effect on my wife's computer, so I was trying to decide whether a bigger flash drive would have even more benefits.

On the question of a RAM upgrade, I wouldn't think twice about doing this on my desktop, but I've never actually opened up a laptop. However, inspired by your comments, I have just run the Crucial Memory Scanner, and found that doubling the memory capacity in my wife's laptop will only cost me £18. I expected it to be a great deal more!

So, as this isn't much more than the cost of a larger flash drive, I've ordered the memory modules.

As I said above, I've never done any laptop surgery before, but I think last month's (or was it the month before?) PCA had an article on fitting laptop upgrades, so I must dig it out and read up on it.

Do you have any particular tips on the process, other than usual static electricity warnings?

  User-1229748 16:00 26 Dec 2008

a wise choice if i may say so,hope it goes well as i'm sure it will :o)

  Pineman100 18:31 26 Dec 2008

Thanks smackheadz.

  rdave13 19:19 26 Dec 2008

Have a look on youtube; click here
After your ram upgrade then try ReadyBoost.

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