OEM or Full

  dan05delaney 22:22 05 Feb 2007
Locked

I am currently buliding my own PC an dwas wondering should i pay the huge price tag for Vista ultimate or buy the OEM Version for a much lower price tag,
any help is highly welcome

  Totally-braindead 22:31 05 Feb 2007

It depends whether you might change the motherboard while you have it. OEM dies with the PC it is on. You can add memory, change graphics cards add hard drives etc but when the computer dies you lose windows as well.
With the full package you can install it on your next PC as well (providing you delete it off the old one first).
If you're not going to replace the motherboard then OEM makes some sense.
Only you can decide.

I have used XP x64 OEM Tech Advancement and have changed hardware not just once but many times and on each occasion I have been able to reactivate if it was needed. As far as I am aware
nothing has changed for Vista OEM.

  Totally-braindead 19:12 07 Feb 2007

As long as you don't change the motherboard OEM will continue to work.

Interesting one this as I have never owned what you would call a purchased system. I changed my motherboard more than once under XP SP2 and more than once under XP x64. I went three MB's without reactivation, they were all Asus Intel MB's.
I suspect the the theory needs testing but if TB's right its no problem as my current MB has Quad support. MS has catagorically stated the T&C have not changed for Vista but what MS say and do
have a habit of being two different things. Keep you posted if I do switch.

  Totally-braindead 20:46 07 Feb 2007

Microsoft have changed some of their Terms and Conditions for Vista.

Customer concerns over changes to Windows Vista licensing that would limit a transfer of the license to only one machine have moved Microsoft to revise the operating system licensing policy.

Microsoft said today it has changed the retail license terms for Vista so that customers now may uninstall the OS from one machine and install it on another as many times as they want. The new terms do away with limitations on the number of new devices to which the license can be transferred.

However, to continue the discouragement of piracy, Microsoft has worded the license so that it is clear that users cannot "share this license between devices."

Background
When the new licensing was disclosed several weeks ago, power users who rebuild their computers with new components several times a year or who plan to upgrade their computers more than once in the lifetime of the OS raised a fuss. They demanded clarification from the vendor about how scenarios like these would play out under the new licensing

According to Shanen Boettcher, a Windows general manager at Microsoft, the company thinks it has come up with an answer to placate those users without encouraging software piracy, which the original change was designed to thwart.

"We think this clarification strikes the right balance," he says. Boettcher says the piracy problem has nothing to do with "the enthusiast community that was sending me e-mails," but with people who install one licensed copy of Windows on many machines and then sell those to other users.

"This is a definite improvement over the original licensing terms, and I'm glad Microsoft has relented," says Don Smutny, a Windows user and software developer for a large IT company in the midwestern United States. However, he still is not convinced there aren't other hidden complications within Vista's license that will have to be addressed later

  Totally-braindead 21:13 07 Feb 2007

This is not for OEM. Its true sometimes you can move windows onto a new PC and it will work but in some cases it won't.
You are not allowed to move Vista or XP OEM onto another machine and they tie themselves to the motherboard.
The article you have there is an article about the Full version of windows not the OEM version. Originally Microsoft was proposing that even people who had full versions of windows would not be allowed to upgrade as they saw fit. They changed that.
OEM still is meant to die with the PC it is on.

  Forum Editor 00:09 08 Feb 2007

The text you've pasted into your response refers to retail licenses, not OEM software.

The situation with OEM licences - and it has not changed for Vista - is that an OEM license 'dies' when the machine on which it was originally activated dies. The whole idea of an OEM operating system license is that it is intended to be used to install the software on a brand new computer, and on that computer only - it may not be installed on a second machine, even if the first computer no longer exists.

A while ago there was a great deal of confusion over this OEM license question - Microsoft originally stated that OEM software licenses could be purchased by system builders only, and could be bought from resellers only if the purchase included a significant hardware item. What was happening however, was that retailers were selling the licences to just about anyone, and the whole thing became a farce.

About a year ago Microsoft clarified the situation by saying that anyone could buy an OEM version of Windows, provided they did so in order to install it on a new computer. In effect the company made potential system builders of us all, although there has been no relaxation of the rule that the software license dies with the machine on which it's installed.

I was aware that this referred to the retail product after all this is stated in the FIRST LINE OF THE TEXT this was simply pasted to clarify the changes concerning Vista in general as it comes from a Microsoft source. The text continues on but this was the most relevant relating to Vista and its GUL.

  Totally-braindead 00:47 08 Feb 2007

Alexiussooty you said "I have used XP x64 OEM Tech Advancement and have changed hardware not just once but many times and on each occasion I have been able to reactivate if it was needed. As far as I am aware
nothing has changed for Vista OEM."
Now however you meant it, it reads that OEM can allow hardware changes without problem.
I mentioned later on that if you don't change the motherboard it will work and you replied "Microsoft said today it has changed the retail license terms for Vista so that customers now may uninstall the OS from one machine and install it on another as many times as they want. The new terms do away with limitations on the number of new devices to which the license can be transferred"
Now perhaps you meant retail as in full version but thats not how it reads to me and its now how many users of the Forum will read it either.
Your postings were confusing and seemed to imply that OEM could be moved to a new motherboard and reactivated.
You start your posts going on about OEM and saying how many times you moved it to a new motherboard without reactivation and then post again about changes in the licencing that Microsoft made which seems to say that you can move to a new computer with no problem.
Perhaps you were not confused as you were doing the typing but what you have written seems confusing to me and would be to others.
And if you do manage to move an OEM copy of windows to another PC and it doesn't require reactivation you are breaking the rules anyway regardless of whether it works or not.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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