Why

  ronalddonald 14:47 19 Sep 2009
Locked

is that Machester seems to have more gun crime, click here

Havent the plice the resources to deal with it.

  bremner 15:24 19 Sep 2009

The most recent Home Office statistics 2006/7 show that of the 9608 firearms offences 35% ( 3362) occurred in London and 10% (960) in Manchester.

The population of Greater London was 8.3m and Greater Manchester 2.2m.

London has just over 31,000 police and Manchester has just over 8000 police.

As you can see the figures are to all intents comparable with London having just over 4 times the number of crimes, population and police officers.

Do any force have enough officers? No but there is only so much money available.

What is most worrying is that all Chief Constables and the Commissioner are being told their budgets will be cut in the coming years and they are virtually all claiming this will result in a reduction in frontline police officers.

  Forum Editor 15:31 19 Sep 2009

that enables you to draw the conclusion that Manchester has more gun crime?

  kidsis 15:38 19 Sep 2009

the reason why we will keep on getting more gun crime and more knife crime is because the police and courts are not allowed to deal with it properly. The vast majority of people arrested seem to be "released on police bail". Only this week I read of an elderly lady in care who was kidnapped and raped by her carer: response? said person was "Released on police bail". For a long time now as I read teletext items on crimes, when it gets to that bit we sing it out in unison. Then, the govt tells courts not to send people to prison (oh yes they do). Prisons are too full, so people are released early. When you hear reports on the news that someone has been sentenced to "at least" 20 years, 30 years, do you really believe it? You shouldn't. That is why gun and knife crime will only increase.

  Jak_1 19:08 19 Sep 2009

forum member is qite right. I will add that someone sentenced to serve a minimum tarrif means that they are eligble for parol when that minimum date arrives. Very few are released on their first parole hearing. If they are refused parole they then have to wait a further 2 years before their next parole hearing, the second hearing is their best chance of parole. If they fail on the second attempt they then have to wait a further 4 years, each time the wait gets longer and harder to gain parole.

  Stuartli 22:14 19 Sep 2009

If you want to know more about the work of the police and how stretched forces are these days, get hold of "Perverting the Course of Justice" by Inspector Gadget.

The book was published last year and penned by a serving Inspector in the Yorkshire area; I'm currently about half way through the book.

You will be unlikely to knock the police too zealously again in future. See:

click here

where you can read an 25 page extract.

  bremner 11:06 20 Sep 2009

Thanks for highlighting the book, as I have said many times on these forums the problems with policing lay with politicians and senior management not the front line officers.

I am sure that nurses and teachers will say exactly the same.

  kidsis 11:09 20 Sep 2009

fair comment about it being an "allegation", but I still say that far too many people are being given bail when the crime they are accused of is extremely serious. This really never used to happen. I also remember reading recently about the increase in crime being committed by people on bail (Telegraph 15 September I believe). These are serious crimes.
And with the number of people in prison, and lack of prison places, I would still like to bet that those sentenced now to 20 or 30 years will not serve that amount of time (though I may not be around to collect). The govt cannot afford to build more prisons, the number of prison spaces cannot therefore grow. Therefore people have to be released early in order to accommodate new (and growing numbers of) prisoners.

  kidsis 11:09 20 Sep 2009

fair comment about it being an "allegation", but I still say that far too many people are being given bail when the crime they are accused of is extremely serious. This really never used to happen. I also remember reading recently about the increase in crime being committed by people on bail (Telegraph 15 September I believe). These are serious crimes.
And with the number of people in prison, and lack of prison places, I would still like to bet that those sentenced now to 20 or 30 years will not serve that amount of time (though I may not be around to collect). The govt cannot afford to build more prisons, the number of prison spaces cannot therefore grow. Therefore people have to be released early in order to accommodate new (and growing numbers of) prisoners.

  bremner 11:20 20 Sep 2009

Are you getting confused between "police bail' and court bail'.

Police can hold a (non terrorism) suspect without charge for 36 hours before going to a magistrate who can extend that to a maximum 96 hours. This will only be for the most serious offences.

Police will, and always have, bailed suspects so they can make further enquiries and not use the time they can hold the suspect in custody without charge.

Once a suspect has been charged a magistrate will either remand that person in custody or remand them on bail.

The increase in those committing offences whilst on bail refers to "court bail" not "police bail".

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