Which OS are you happy with when it comes to security. GOVS SNOOPING exempt

  rdave13 21:26 24 Oct 2013
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Answered

I'm stuck in my ways and have always preferred Windows. I have a Windows smart phone but would never use it for Banking or any personal email etc. Desktop only.

Question is how secure do you think Apple, Android and Linux are? Smartphones for example?

If any one, including Governments, can easily hack anyone's account, what's the point of having an all singing and dancing phone if easily hacked? Are any OSs worth having if Big Bro sees all?

Possibly worth going back to the Post Office to send and receive correspondence via paper.

Sugar, they've just been sold, the next highest shareholder, below the Gov, are there for greed? So paper snooping is also in line?

Leave that one for the experts.

  woodchip 21:32 24 Oct 2013

Linux is by far the most secure, But I like XP and my Dual 98se Plus XP dual boot desktop

  rdave13 21:52 24 Oct 2013

Linux is by far the most secure, but for how long? No AV required or antimalware. Aren't 'smartphones', some of them anyway, run by Linux? Or are they all Android/Windows?

  Woolwell 21:57 24 Oct 2013

I think that they are not "snooping" into your system but into the traffic to and from it. That is if they are bothered with any of your traffic. Therefore it could be the security of the servers that you interact with rather than your own system that you could possibly be worried about. So it doesn't really matter whether you run Windows or whatever. Unix used to be fairly secure.

  rdave13 22:10 24 Oct 2013

Woolwell , always like you replies. Hope you're well.

Just teasing, really, with this post, as the USA seem to be the biggest hacker on the planet.

According to the News.

They're getting headaches over this from all over.

  Woolwell 23:14 24 Oct 2013

USA may seem to be the biggest hacker but perhaps we should consider China or Russia too.

  rdave13 23:49 24 Oct 2013

Woolwell, and of course the good old UK, married to the USA. It's really laughable as to the data they collected will be overwhelmed by what they can find. Simply put the US have put strained relationships with a lot of countries over this. With the exception of the UK which is hand in glove, no doubt. We're the stepping zone to Europe for their U.Spyware. Airways. ACME. firm.

  rdave13 23:52 24 Oct 2013

China and Russia and all the rest. Snoops every where, even your neighbour , if they're the same as mine.. :(

  oresome 09:07 25 Oct 2013

*Possibly worth going back to the Post Office to send and receive correspondence via paper. Sugar, they've just been sold.........*

I must have missed it!

Royal Mail have been sold in part. The Post Office are quite separate.

  rdave13 16:10 25 Oct 2013

So it looks as Linux is the 'safest'. I did try 'Mint' once, on a laptop, but couldn't for the life of me set up the wlan. OK on Ethernet though.

  Forum Editor 17:28 25 Oct 2013

"Simply put the US have put strained relationships with a lot of countries over this."

That may be the case, but to understand America's actions you need to understand what a massive shock to the nation 9/11 was. That shock is still reverberating in the national psyche, and it has coloured the country's whole approach to national security.

In Europe we've become accustomed to all kinds of terrorist groups detonating bombs - it has been happening for a very long time. We tend to take a pragmatic approach to such things - we know that you can never eliminate terrorist actions, no matter how alert you might be. America doesn't have our experience, but it does have a history of knowing that it is the richest and most powerful nation on the planet. Americans believed their country was unassailable, and to have that illusion shattered in such a fashion has left them understandably jumpy.

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