Sulphur Candle Indoors

  morddwyd 12:41 12 Oct 2011
Locked

For the past couple of seasons I've been troubled by a massive ants' nest behind the panelling in the conservatory.

Nothing I've so far tried has worked, and I'm wondering if a sulphur candle overnight with the door tightly shut, would do it.

Are soft furnishings likely to hold on the fumes for more that a few days?

  spuds 13:03 12 Oct 2011

Ants have been around for a very long time, so whatever you try, don't expect a 100% success rate.

Once we tried 'smoke bombs' recommended by the local garden centre, but these didn't seem to have an everlasting effect to crawling pest control.

Have you thought about contacting your local council and their pest control officer for advice?.

  morddwyd 13:13 12 Oct 2011

"Have you thought about contacting your local council and their pest control officer for advice?."

Not that much of a problem, they keep very much to themselves!

However, once or twice a year they swarm and fill the conservatory and also get into the house.

Sulphur candle treatment in a greenhouse has to be repeated every year or so, and I would expect the same indoors.

  wiz-king 13:17 12 Oct 2011

No, the fumes should disperse fairly quickly but it wont get rid of the ants and the sulphur dioxide could bleach any fabrics especially if they are damp.

You need to do some cooking :- make a thick sugar syrup. 2/3 sugar, 1/3 water and then add about 1/4 borax (AKA sodium borate, sodium tetraborate, or disodium tetraborate) warm and stir to dissolve and then pour a drop of this mixture onto pieces of thin card of thick paper and place them on the floor around the nest or on any ant runs.

Borax can be obtained from a chemist or an old-fashioned hardware shop.

  wee eddie 14:51 12 Oct 2011

Large numbers of Ants will die but the nests will be unaffected.

  morddwyd 15:21 12 Oct 2011

Insecticides are a well known hazard, and while I use thme for a quick knockdown when the ants swarm I wouldn't think of using them in large doses.

Similarly, I don't think a sulphur candle produces sulphur dioxide, at least it doesn't have the characteristic smell. It simply burns sulphur, giving off choking sulphur fumes.

I'm not sure that reading about just one more of the myriad ways the Americans have of killing themselves, and each other, is relevant, but thanks for the responses anyway.

The only way I know of getting rid of bed bugs and, more importantly their eggs, is by burning, though I'm sure there are less drastic professional methods!

Luckily that's one problem I don't have, yet.

  sunnystaines 16:29 12 Oct 2011

have you tried "nippon" an excellent ant killer

  sunnystaines 16:30 12 Oct 2011

have you tried "nippon" an excellent ant killer

http://www.vitax.co.uk/index.php/area/pest-control/ants-crawling-insects/nippon-ant-killer-liquid/

shop around for best price

  hastelloy 16:50 12 Oct 2011

"Similarly, I don't think a sulphur candle produces sulphur dioxide, at least it doesn't have the characteristic smell. It simply burns sulphur, giving off choking sulphur fumes." Sulphur

Sulphur burns in air or oxygen on gentle heating with a pale blue flame. It produces colourless sulphur dioxide gas.

Or, from Wikipedia "Sulfur burns with a blue flame concomitant with formation of sulfur dioxide, notable for its peculiar suffocating odor."

  bjh 17:08 12 Oct 2011

(Funny; managed to log in as BenJH for that post... thought I'd sorted that problem out ... Anyway, even as bjh, I recommend Nippon!)

  morddwyd 17:21 12 Oct 2011

I always thought sulphur dioxide had the characteristic "rotting eggs" smell, whereas burning sulphur is totally different.

I must be thinking of another sulphur compound.

I have been using Nippon for a while, and it is normally quite effective, but we're talking fairly large size here.

The nest is under the step to the door, under the threshold and floor and up behind the panelling, roughly about 6 or 7 square metres. In the winter they simply move from under the step to under the floor, where it is still warm, temperature today, for instance well over seventy, with no sunshine! Even in January it will be around 55 -60.

Not sure about the necessity for an airflow. Noy much air movement in the greenhouse either, that's the idea, the gas simply seeps into every nook and cranny suffocating any hibernating insects, but not their eggs of course.. That's why you have to repeat the process each year.

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