Studd'n a Dog

  royalflush 19:29 02 Feb 2007
Locked

Ive been given a Full Pedigree Chocolate Labrador while ago & hes amazing freindly & hes got lovely teeth ect basicly hes a great example of he' breed but now i want to Stud him does anyone know what to do as ive got his papers for his pedigree but not sure what eles to do & how much do i charge or whats the going price for this kinda dog...ty

  GANDALF <|:-)> 19:34 02 Feb 2007
  Forum Editor 10:57 03 Feb 2007

We must know the same people. I heard the story about two years ago, and the person who told me said he had heard it from a friend, who heard it.....etc.,etc.

It's a small world.

  spuds 13:28 03 Feb 2007

Having pedigree papers or the dog having good teeth, doesn't mean the dog will be ideal for passing on his genes.The same applies to the female or possible breeding bitch. Many a 'good' dog in the eyes of the owner have proved to be a failure in one respect or another in the breeders market.

I would suggest that you have a word with your vet practise, who may suggest various test procedures, proving that the dog is 100% suitable for possible breeding. Another suggestion is to visit your local library, WH Smith, Borders for further help via books and magazines.Even contact with a breed association can provide amazing results and advice.

Regarding stud fees, this can get very complicated, and again would depend on the pedigree of the stud dog. Dogs that have won championships or have special advantages would provide a higher stud fee rate. Some breeders have a money only, when others may consider 'pick of the litter' plus money. Others agreements will need to be made, and things could get complicated,especially if they are not in contract form, its not just a case of a simple introduction, especially if this is a new venture, or perhaps a thought of an easy quick rich idea.Remember that there are good and bad breeders out there, so be very aware of the way you are going to proceed.

  Ho-Lin-Sok 13:34 03 Feb 2007

I guess you need to keep a false leg in the corner.

  Ho-Lin-Sok 13:50 03 Feb 2007

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  Spark6 15:58 03 Feb 2007

Interesting item on BBC News this morning re black, curly, labrador/standard poodle first cross. Apparently they don't moult, have the Labrador's gentle disposition and some people find them attractive. £500 a time - the price of the stud fee should be attractive.

  josie mayhem 18:31 03 Feb 2007

First port of call the kennel club... Here they will be able to give you all the inforamtion that you need and known breeders...

Its not the case that you go to a breader and say I have a dog and I want to bread it ect.

If the breader is worth there salt they will not only check your dogs suitability with theres... This will mean some back tracking forbearers of your dog and there dog so there is no clashing, but your papers will give most of this information.

But take caution even if everything seems on paper to make a suitable match and terms have been agreed to how the stud will be paid.

Trust your instint, what I mean is see the prospective dog spend a little time with it to see what temperment it has and if you like it... while checking out the dog, check out the owners do you like them, do you like the surroundings that the dog is living in... have they bread dogs before, are they breading for family pets, show dogs and in your case a working dog... and with allthis under your belt are you happy, comfortable with it all, if you have any doubts how ever small then back off and try another breader...

My friend breds great danes, has built up a very good business over the years, but when it comes down to breading and selling litters she is so picky, for breading she checks everything she can about a prospective dog male or female hers or another owners, unless she is totaly comfortable she won't bread.

And selling any of her litters well picky or what... it doesn't matter how much money you have, if you lack knowledge of the bred she won't sale. Even if you have knowledge if you turn up hoping to get a dog, well if she doesn't like you then you don't get one... end of story...

best of luck

  Chris the Ancient 11:27 04 Feb 2007

It wasn't pavlov that was right - it was the dogs.

As one dog said to the other, "Have you noticed that every time the bell rings, that man brings us some food!"

  Aargh 11:57 04 Feb 2007

Royalflush

I have pedigree Lab gundogs - the first thing to remember is what do you want to get out of breeding?

People pay good money for dogs with pedigree - but it depends what. If you want to raise cash by simply selling puppies - fine, but pedigree implies quality. You can happily pay £750 for a 'good' gundog, or £200 for a family pet.

Is the pedigree a working one or a show one?

If you sell a dog, can you declare eye certificates, hip scores and heart scans for your dogs line to convince people they are not buying a dud so they won't come back demanding their money off you!

I have dog with a part pedigree which is one of the best working dogs I have seen. I have another who has a championship field trial background to die for - but the dog has a heart condition which will kill him eventually and makes his pedigree worthless.

Breeding is for experts, and the kennel club takes great efforts to prevent poor breeding from an already over complicated labrador gene pool. Basically they have been so interbred, it is really difficult to ensure results.

Good dogs are always bred on reputations (dog & breeder) backed up by pedigree and medical paperwork.

My advice unless you are prepared for hassle is to leave it to the 'experts'. If however, your dog is a cracker that people want to breed with, you can easily get £500 for him to cover a bitch.

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