Strike goes ahead on Nov 5th

  john bunyan 13:24 05 Nov 2010
Locked

No, not the FBU, but the BBC chapel of the NUJ. No Today programme today. Why can't they learn from the FBU? (Said he, ironically)

  Woolwell 13:28 05 Nov 2010

I thought that Breakfast on BBC was better this morning!

  Al94 14:27 05 Nov 2010

I think we could manage very well without many of these over paid, over rated "stars"

  johndrew 14:34 05 Nov 2010

Perhaps the BBC will realise it has a greater number of (overpaid?) journalists than it needs and use this opportunity to cut its costs. Especially in the light of the NUJ statement that 'many of its members could earn more elsewhere' - this heard on BBC Radio 2 this morning.

  961 15:10 05 Nov 2010

Andrew Neil and Emma Crosby (fresh from GMTV) bothered to get out of bed

Good on them!

  Forum Editor 16:39 05 Nov 2010

Everything's relative. A well-known 'face' like Fiona Bruce can certainly attract a high salary - she probably gets around £800,000 a year on her current contract.

There aren't many like her though, and lesser mortals are paid far less. Compared to people in other spheres of entertainment - like footballers for instance - TV newsreaders are not particularly well paid. They are likely to be even less well remunerated if Mark Thompson's intended salary cuts go through. When contracts are re-negotiated "....it is understood that anyone on screen or behind a microphone earning more than £100,000 a year faces a pay cut of 25 per cent when their contracts are renegotiated and for the highly paid stars, the salary reduction could be as much as 40 per cent."

  Al94 16:49 05 Nov 2010

Reminds me of this click here

  rawprawn 17:05 05 Nov 2010

Al94 excellent link and very topical.

As far as the post from FE, I wish I could get a 25% cut of over £100000, and I would be extremely happy with a 40% cut for this unstated "Highly Paid" job.
I simply fail to understand how any presenter can be worth such huge salaries as are reported.
I include overpaid footballers in this category as well, do they realise that the cost of taking ones family to a match is prohibitive for many people.

  spuds 18:28 05 Nov 2010

If the strike goes ahead, I wonder how many people will notice it, and whether it will have any effect on humanity?.

Far to many people nowadays are paid far in excess as to the true worth of the job they do. Perhaps this move by the BBC is in the right direction, but only if it starts from the top and works it way down. The same might apply for other 'we must pay the going rate' companies.

Perhaps moving from this title. But I notice that one banker as just resigned and been placed on 'gardening leave' for six months, because he's been head-hunted by a competitor, and his present contract doesn't allow him to start a similar job straight-away. Full pay, all perks still retained for the next six month. I wonder if the 'average' worker gets the same, or just told goodbye!.

  morddwyd 19:52 05 Nov 2010

"....it is understood that anyone on screen or behind a microphone earning more than £100,000 a year faces a pay cut of 25 per cent when their contracts are renegotiated and for the highly paid stars, the salary reduction could be as much as 40 per cent."

But maybe some other restrictions will be lifted, so that they can earn elsewhere.

I believe the current contracts are quite restrictive so that none of the BBC's so called "high profiles" appear in an inappropriate context, be it advertising margarine or on a calendar.

  spuds 21:36 05 Nov 2010

But most write books about themselves or articles of interest including newspaper columns, and get fees from that type of work.

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