Stating the Obvious

  morddwyd 09:30 13 Mar 2012
Locked

"The Public Accounts Committee said the UK's road network could deteriorate."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17343853

Could? Could?

  Bingalau 09:44 13 Mar 2012

It would be brilliant if some inventor could come up with a road surface that didn't deteriorate at all. Maybe an inch or so thick plastic/polythene embedded with a "grip" of some sort. Lay-ed on the top of our existing roads. Maybe it, being plastic, would last for ever. I know I am in the realms of fantasy but it seems to me that we have got to start thinking "outside the box". Is that the expression? or should we have a nationwide "Think Tank" to throw all sorts of daft and maybe some sensible suggestions in to a suggestion box? Tarmac seems to have been around for ever.

  morddwyd 09:58 13 Mar 2012

It doesn't matter what the roads are made of, it's the amount of money not being spent on them that is the problem.

And it doesn't matter if it's toads, machinery or the human body, the less you spend on maintenance, the quicker it will deteriorate.

  Quickbeam 10:17 13 Mar 2012

If you replace could deteriorate, with has deteriorated, it'll obviously be more accurate.

  gigagiggles 11:57 13 Mar 2012

There is no business model within a capitalist society that would make sense to manufacture a product that doesn't deteriorate or become obsolescent. The idea is to get users to buy, buy, buy until the product is improved upon. If the road material doesn't need to be improved upon, because it doesn't crack or break apart or break down, there is no impetus to buy at a higher price and there is no impetus to produce at a lower price.

  interzone55 11:59 13 Mar 2012

I like the plastic road idea, but it would have to be permeable, otherwise water would just stand on the surface.

  Woolwell 12:39 13 Mar 2012

Unfortunately there was (probably still is) a stretch of the A30 between Exeter and Honiton which was constructed of concrete and had the reputation of being the noisiest road surface in UK.

Resin is used in the construction of high friction areas of road eg near traffic lights.

  proudfoot 12:42 13 Mar 2012

I don't think ordinary Tarmac is permeable. There is a new road surfacing material that is bound by tar but is finely ground glass. It gives a far quieter ride as there is less tyre noise. I also believe it is also more hard wearing

  Aitchbee 12:51 13 Mar 2012

Regarding water drainage on proposed 'plastic surfaced roads'....I suggest drilling deep holes into the plastic roads, so rainwater was not an issue.

10,000 holes every mile of road, drilled to a depth of 1000 metres with a diameter of 2 centimetres.

  finerty 13:03 13 Mar 2012

well lets face it, i thinks this silly Gov is planning to bring in wait for it More Road Tolls gulp

  Quickbeam 14:36 13 Mar 2012

Blackburn in Lancashire managed quite well with only 4000 holes for the whole town HB...

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