As the Pumps Run Dry...

  peter99co 19:47 16 Jun 2008
Locked

Is there a danger that the sediment in the bottom of the tanks will give us problems when refilling takes place. Will it be like stirring up an old pond?

I would think we need to make sure the cars fuel filter is in good condition.

  Quickbeam 20:21 16 Jun 2008

The fuel filter is best be changed every service anyway. Most fuel tanks are plastic now also, so the old steel ones that got rusty if you didn't keep them full can't leave rotten deposits in the bottom. The biggest problem is water contamination and lying at the bottom of the tank to get drawn in.

  wiz-king 05:28 17 Jun 2008

If you are thinking of the tanks in the filling station then they get stirred up by the petrol going down a 4" hose at speed anyway, ditto for your cars tank - that golden liquid comes out fast. However any water or rust soon settles out due to the very low viscosity of petrol - one of the reasons why most filling station wont let you fill up while they have a delivery (and the long queue to pay for the stuff!).

  Bingalau 08:46 17 Jun 2008

What do they do with the large tanks when a petrol station closes down. Are they removed? Are they filled up with sand or something solid? Where does the sediment end up? Can the tanks be used for anything else?

  jack 09:06 17 Jun 2008

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  interzone55 09:13 17 Jun 2008

When a garage closes the tanks are pumped out, then vented for a long period.

I don't think they're filled up for a while because there is a danger that gases forced out by the incoming sand (or whatever) could explode.

Tescos bought a patch of land vacated by a local garage, but the land was empty for 5 years before Tesco built on it. I don't think the 5 year wait was just to get the design of the store right...

  Cymro. 12:34 17 Jun 2008

I have ran some very old cars and on a very low budget in the past. So I would run out of petrol from time to time and never did I get any problem with sediment in the bottom of my cars petrol tank.

As Quickbeam has suggested the fuel filter in a car would take care of any such problem. It seems to me that it is just some sort of urban myth that sediment in the bottom of a cars fuel tank can be a problem.

As for water in the system that would be more of a problem in a diesel powered car and even then the fuel filter is suppose to take care of it.

  VNAM75 12:58 17 Jun 2008

When you change the fuel filter is it important to fill it up with fresh fuel?

  Stuartli 14:20 17 Jun 2008

>>some sort of urban myth that sediment in the bottom of a cars fuel tank can be a problem.>>

What! You've never had a carburetter's jet(s) block up due to dirt in the fuel?

Usual trick to cure it was to depress the clutch, rev the engine up, choose a lowish gear and then let the clutch in quickly.

  Stuartli 14:20 17 Jun 2008

>>some sort of urban myth that sediment in the bottom of a cars fuel tank can be a problem.>>

What! You've never had a carburetter's jet(s) block up due to dirt in the fuel?

Usual trick to cure it was to depress the clutch, rev the engine up, choose a lowish gear and then let the clutch in quickly.

  Cymro. 14:22 17 Jun 2008

No actually I haven't and have been driving for over 40 years.

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