Is part time working becoming the normal?.

  spuds 17:54 04 Apr 2014
Locked
Answered

This is a post more out of curiosity than anything else, and perhaps some my own experiences, and I was wondering what other people's thoughts were on this?.

This morning I had reason to contact both my GP's and also my Dentist practice for reasonably urgent appointments. Started off at 8AM with a telephone call to the GP's, because that is the only was the practice will accept that days appointments.Originally when I joined that practice about 45 years ago, there were three partners working Monday to Friday 8AM till 6.30PM, with Saturday morning 9AM till 12 noon, plus emergency call-out throughout the night if required. Now the practice as about 12 GP's on the books, with most only working 2 or 3 days maximum at the most. No evening or weekend work, With a working pattern of 8.30AM till 6PM and 12.50PM till 1.50PM closed for lunch.

Phoning the dentist brought even more surprises, because it would appear they have also changed their working pattern. Previously this was a practice of senior partner and six other dentist's. With a recent big extention to the building, the senior partner remains and a further four/five dentist's have been appointed, now making a total of ten/eleven dentist's on the books. Previous working pattern was 8.15AM to 6.00PM Monday to Friday, with Wednesday late opening till 8PM, plus Saturday mornings 9AM till 1.30PM. Now its 9AM till 5.30PM Monday to Friday with 1.15PM to 2.15PM lunchbreak. The regular dentist I use apparently only works 3 days a week, with Friday off, so I need to wait till Monday for treatment.

Not complaining about this personally, but is other forum member's finding changes to the way they are being dealt with, in respect of services, considering that we are being constantly told that we now live in a 24/7 society?.

  Aitchbee 18:17 04 Apr 2014

Funnily enough, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that the local Post Office which had a complete refurbish last month, now, is open-all-hours 9.00am to 5.30pm every day-of-the-week [including sundays].

Previously, it 'closed for lunch' between 1pm-2pm (mon-fri) and early closing at 12.30pm on saturdays, and no sunday service.

PS. The number of counters/tills has been reduced from 3 to 2, but all-in-all, a big improvement for customers living locally and even further afield!

  fourm member 20:00 04 Apr 2014

I think you could be jumping to conclusions.

Shortly after being told I couldn't get a dental appointment on a certain day of the week because the dentist doesn't work that day I discovered that a friend, who goes to a dentist in a different town, is treated by the same person.

I remember as a child having a doctor. If he was ill (and he often was) there might be someone covering for him. The more doctors in a practice, the easiest it is to cover sickness and holidays.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 20:18 04 Apr 2014

Since being made redundant 3 years ago, I now work for myself and definitely only work part time.

Learnt that work wasn't the most important thing and now enjoy some family life.

Could have worked to day but instead went out with friends instead :0)

  namtas 20:28 04 Apr 2014

I believe that it is and if so it would distort the figures for unemployment. I am sure that some on here will argue that many people want part time, I would argue that most people who want work want to work full time, but they have no option.

  wee eddie 21:41 04 Apr 2014

I have heard that many Doctors now work 3, 12 hour shifts in one Practice, and then cover for someone in another Practice

  spuds 01:13 05 Apr 2014

There is possibly a connection that some 'professionals' are working or doing other tasks. I knew of a ENT consultant who split his week into four sections, consisting of using his time between the NHS, Private Hospital, University lecturer and running a private practice from his home.

In the GP practice I visited earlier today, the GP I was expecting to see was not there. Apparently he was away "catching up on paperwork", yet this same GP who is the remaining senior partner of the practice, reduced his working week in attendance at the practice from 4 days to now three,and that doesn't include the apparent now extra day to catch up with paperwork at home.

Another personal factor, was two weeks ago I had an appointment to see a consultant in one of the local hospital's, because it was her particular day there. When I arrived, the consultant was apparently away that day, and a 'specialist nurse' was standing in for the consultant. Not complaining, the task of the day got done.

Another point of interest, is that most if not all the vet practices in the city I live, have introduced different working practices over the past few years. One example is the previous emergency or out of hours, this no longer applies, because all this type of work is now contracted out, so making the patient and owner or carer having to travel further for urgent treatment.

But it does make one wonder, if people, especially in certain trades and professions are taking to much on, or not really enough, considering some of these people may get high financial rewards through the trades or professions they follow?.

  spuds 01:18 05 Apr 2014

wee eddie

The locum service in my area, might consist of a GP based in Germany, Ireland or similar destinations, who spend part of their week in the UK and the rest at their home destination. Travelling between countries, then staying in hotels or rented flats while here in the UK.

  spuds 18:40 08 Apr 2014
Answer

Possibly a time for a tick?.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Elsewhere on IDG sites

Xiaomi Mi Mix 2 review

What went wrong at the Designs of the Year 2017

iPhone X news: Release date, price, new features & specs

Comment regarder des séries et talk-shows américains en France ?