Not often do I struggle for words, but....

  Forum Editor 20:23 24 Mar 2015
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Answered

this kind of thing just leaves me searching for the right ones to express my feelings.

It's not a unique event, I know, but quite horrific. I have travelled on aircraft a great deal, and of course it has crossed my mind many times - what if? Sixteen of the passengers were students returning from an exchange trip.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 20:51 24 Mar 2015
Answer

Air travel is the safest form of transport - but when it goes wrong then its devastating for all concerned

  rdave13 00:10 25 Mar 2015

I can only echo the sentiments above. At the moment it is being treated as an accident. Devastating for all the families.

  john bunyan 08:00 25 Mar 2015

I agree with the earlier postings. In my military and civilian careers I did a lot of flying ,and had a few "moments", but there is little one can say when these tragedies occur.

I cannot imagine the anguish of the friends and relatives of the victims of this, and indeed the 2 Malaysian airlines, and the Indonesian crashes - non of which have yet been fully explained.

  Belatucadrus 12:10 26 Mar 2015

It looks as if they now believe the Co Pilot crashed the plane deliberately.

BBC Breaking news

  Al94 12:15 26 Mar 2015

So it appears this is likely to be the person responsible click here

The last few minutes must have been indescribably horrendous for all on board.

That this is able to happen is shocking to say the least and must surely lead to an immediate rethink on the locked door policy. I fail to understand how there is no FAA requirement (although voluntary policy with some airlines) for a member of cabin crew to replace a pilot if one of them has for any reason to leave the cockpit so that at no time is the flight deck manned with only one person. That would surely reduce the risk of such an event.

Proves the weakness in air safety in it's most basic form.

  Quickbeam 13:31 26 Mar 2015

This is unreal.

  Flak999 14:40 26 Mar 2015

This will bring forward the psychological profiling of aircrew, that this could happen on a first world western aircraft is frankly incredible. Whatever the reasons for this madmans act of mass murder are, we must put in place robust measures to try to ensure as far as possible that this cannot happen again.

  wee eddie 15:09 26 Mar 2015

We need to know more:

For example, why no passenger managed to use a Mobile Phone to tell of what was happening?

There is more to this than meets the eye

  Forum Editor 15:27 26 Mar 2015

A194

"I fail to understand how there is no FAA requirement (although voluntary policy with some airlines) for a member of cabin crew to replace a pilot if one of them has for any reason to leave the cockpit so that at no time is the flight deck manned with only one person."

Exactly - to me - and probably most people - that's a pretty obvious precautionary measure. It's so obvious in fact, that I would hazard a guess most countries have incorporated it into aviation authority rules. Canada certainly has. This is what Canadian Aviation regulations say about a situation where one pilot is out of the flight deck and the pilot remaining at the controls becomes incapacitated.

"For aircraft not equipped with a means (for a crew member) to access the flight deck from the passenger compartment, such as a key pad, a third crew member must be brought into the flight deck prior to the pilot leaving in order to protect access to the flight deck."

I imagine most airlines have similar rules in place, but I don't know.

What I do know is that on an A320 the flight deck access door can be opened from outside by entering a code on a keypad. The flaw in the aircraft systems (in my opinion) is that there is a locking switch on two of the flight deck control panels which, if operated, overrides the code entry system, and prevents all access from outside. The manufacturers provide a camera system which allows the flight deck crew to see who is trying to get in, so they can unlock the door from inside, but if there's only one person inside, and that person decides that nobody can come in, then......

  Al94 15:36 26 Mar 2015

For example, why no passenger managed to use a Mobile Phone to tell of what was happening?

At 38000 feet above the alps down to 6000 feet unlikely there would be signal.

There are reports surfacing that this pilot's training was interrupted due to depression so maybe profiling would help. Certainly there would be no cost (other than a small drop in sales revenue to passengers) to a cabin crew member being on the flight deck when one of the pilots leaves - they could presumably at least allow the door to be opened. Norwegian Air have just announced they are making it policy to always have 2 on the flight deck as it is in many other airlines including the one we like to hate most!

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