New Zealand take the lead in banning software patents.

  LastChip 02:10 30 Aug 2013
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Answered

At last, a country has taken action to stop the nonsense that originated in the USA, with companies and patent trolls using patents as a method of stopping competition. It was (in many cases) just a legalised version of extortion - you pay me x million and you can sell your product.

From my prospective, although genuine innovation should be protected, patents for "rounded corners" are just a poor joke and someone at some point, had to stop the rot.

Let's now hope, other countries (ours included) look at what New Zealand has done and follow suite.

You can find more information here.

  Chronos the 2nd 05:05 30 Aug 2013

I can see Apple being particularly miffed at this development. On a similar point at the moment I am unable to sell downloaded games usually bought via Steam which is, in my opinion a a ridiculous situation, but there are moves to change this also.

I have tens of games I would like to sell on but I am being prevented from doing so because I do not actually own the games, seemingly I subscribe to these games.

  Forum Editor 06:43 30 Aug 2013

"patents for "rounded corners" are just a poor joke and someone at some point, had to stop the rot."

The New Zealand legislation hasn't stopped that particular 'rot'. Their revised legislation only applies to software patents. The move was driven by the IT industry, which has long campaigned to have the law on software patents abandoned.

Copyright still applies however.

  Forum Editor 06:54 30 Aug 2013

Chronos the 2nd

"I have tens of games I would like to sell on but I am being prevented from doing so because I do not actually own the games, seemingly I subscribe to these games."

That has nothing to do with patents, it's a copyright licencing issue. When you subscribe to Steam you agree that you will not sell or rent any downloaded software to a third party. You may trade certain subscriptions in the Steam market place, but that's it.

You don't buy the games at all, you simply buy a licence to use the software. It's a standard software licencing situation. The difference here is that with Microsoft Office for instance, you are allowed to sell your licence to a third party, provided you first uninstall the software from any computers in your possession.

  Chronos the 2nd 08:03 30 Aug 2013

Thank you for taking the time to type out what I all ready knew and I appreciate the point about that it had nothing to do with patents, again I knew that. But I was trying to make the point that like patent laws, copyright rules are also in need of change.

If I purchase virtually anything else it is mine to do with as I see fit, I buy a game, or a bit of software I am then restricted in what I can do with this game/software.

  LastChip 12:21 30 Aug 2013
Answer

FE, bad choice of an example on my part, but the principle remains and if I had my way, it would also apply to rounded corners or any other frivolous claim.

I think I remember (but maybe wrong) the UK and German courts throwing that one out - quite right too.

  Forum Editor 18:34 31 Aug 2013

Chronos the 2nd

"Thank you for taking the time to type out what I all ready knew"

Well if you knew, why bring it up in a thread about patents? There was no need for the sarcasm, I simply responded to what you wrote.

"I buy a game, or a bit of software I am then restricted in what I can do with this game/software."

That's because you don't buy the game - you buy the right to use the software. You're licensed to use it by the copyright owner, and if the terms of the licence prohibit onward sale, that's it.

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