Microsoft’s biggest mistake - Of late

  wee eddie 21:02 12 Nov 2013
Locked

I have just been reading Jim Martin’s editorial in this month’s edition of PCA and I think that his analysis is totally wrong.

In my opinion, Microsoft’s biggest mistake, with W8, was not making the Home Page attractive. Instead they used blocks of colour that you would not give House Room. The colours they used are ones you would not wear, put on your car or decorate your house with. Yuk – Not clever!

Had they made that home page attractive or, have the potential to be made attractive, then customers would have vied to make it their own. My desktop, for example, is the photograph of my choice. Currently some extreme sailing, but it’s frequently the Ordinance Survey’s monthly Photo.

On it I have a number of “finger sized” Shortcuts. The Recycle Bin and My Computer, 3 Folders that I access almost daily, a Folder of this month’s Yoga Exercises and half a dozen Files that I am currently working on. All tucked away on the left hand edge, so that they do not detract from the stunning picture of four, black sailed Racing Yachts in a stiff breeze, I also have an Analogue Clock face in the other corner. That’s it.

As it is W8 has a screen that resembles regurgitated puke

  mbc 22:34 12 Nov 2013

Their biggest mistake was issuing it at all. Behind all the propaganda, the truth is pure greed. Microsoft had cast envious eyes on the success of App;e and Google in selling apps, and have tried to emulate them.

  wee eddie 11:23 13 Nov 2013

I have been thinking some more on this, particularly about the differences between Apple and Microsoft.

Apple manage to design things that are so desirable that we are willing to jump through any number of hoops to own and operate them.

Microsoft design clunky goods that do the job, usually, but we expect them to be similar to what went before and are reticent when making the necessary changes, to our habits, in order to operate them.

  wee eddie 11:27 13 Nov 2013

In fact, it can be simplified thus:

When Apple bring out a new product, many of us start drooling.

When Microsoft bring out a new product, a lot of us ask why it is being forced upon us!

  namtas 12:07 13 Nov 2013

I think that the position can be simplified. One listens to what the market wants, and tries to meet that requirement. The other is so big and feels so powerful that it will decide what people want.

  chub_tor 12:55 13 Nov 2013

namtas I can't entirely agree with your statement The other is so big and feels so powerful that it will decide what people want. Microsoft will have done their market research and seen that the trend is away from desktop computers to smaller and more transportable means of connecting to the internet and particularly to devices with a touch interface. With that in mind they brought out Windows 8, an operating system designed to be used with touch screens and if you have used it on such a device you will find that it works very well and is very intuitive.

The mistake in my opinion was in not advising users of Win 7 with conventional desktop or non touch laptops that Win 8 would not give them any advantage other than speed of boot up.

  wee eddie 13:45 13 Nov 2013

One of the most interesting things about market research is that it only answers the questions that you ask it and it contains all your preconceptions.

For example: Just because almost everybody is buying small devices with Touch Interfaces does not mean that the Desktop is dead/dying.

What I think it means is that the incremental improvements in Desktop PCs are now so small that people will only replace their current Model when it starts to fail, and the product is now so much more reliable that its life-span has increased in leaps and bounds.

While it is possible to Create and Edit content on a Hand Held Device, it is difficult and not really that efficient. IMHO - The Desktop, well a Keyboard, Mouse and Screen anyway, will be creative input of choice for years to come.

  chub_tor 14:32 13 Nov 2013

While it is possible to Create and Edit content on a Hand Held Device, it is difficult and not really that efficient. IMHO - The Desktop, well a Keyboard, Mouse and Screen anyway, will be creative input of choice for years to come. and there we disagree. I accept that businesses, professional people who have to write a lot for their living, graphic designers and the like will always have the need for a keyboard and mouse. But the younger generation are growing up with iPads, tablets, phones and have no need or desire to be hampered by mechanical keys. Have you seen them texting on a phone with icons I can hardly see? They can do it faster than I can touch type!

  Algerian peter ™ 14:40 13 Nov 2013

wee eddie

"The colours they used are ones you would not wear"

My best shirt!

click here

  wee eddie 14:59 13 Nov 2013

chub_tor: Now try to create a Database, Spreadsheet or write, and edit, a book on your iPad. As for editing Photos!

Of course Hand Held Devices are great for emails and Facebook, watching Videos and keeping up with the news. In fact I have almost said as much in my 1.45 posting, but I wouldn't like to keep my Accounts on something as ephemeral and easily removed as an iPad.

  Just.me 20:20 13 Nov 2013

Microsoft have realised that there are no new groundbreaking programs on the horizon. Their word processor is so bloated with things that most people will never use, their spreadsheet is about as perfected as it will ever be and that lots of people are using mobile phones and that is where Microsoft wants to be

click here .

Their big mistake is trying to foist a mobile phone system on to the computer. Just imagine the reaction if a major car manufacturer decided to move into the bicycle market and produced a car with pedals and a handlebar just so that they could use the same system on the bicycles and cars.

The computer and mobile phone are separate products and should be developed as such.

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