The Legal Height of a Fence

  BigRik 19:51 25 Feb 2010
Locked

A public footpath which runs behind our garden is at a higher level than our garden is.

From our side, the fence is 6ft, which I'm led to believe is the legal limit. However, from the public side, the fence is 9in shorter.

Should the height of the fence not been decided from the highest level of ground?

  MAT ALAN 20:04 25 Feb 2010

Hedges. These are not covered by planning permission so you can go to any height except the neighbours can take action using the high hedges regulations. Under these regs you might have to bring the height down to 6' 6" if the hedge is keeping light from neighbours house windows.

Fences. Up to any height if you get planning permission. Without permission you can go up to 6'6" except it is 3'3" adjacent to a highway. Adjacent is subject to interpretation, and in this case the definition of highway is any verge, path, or road - but their must be a road involved, not just a path.

The heights are measured from the land on the side of whoever puts up the fence, and it is the original land before any lanscaping or decking etc

  BigRik 20:19 25 Feb 2010

It is just a public footpath, there is no road, so if I understand correctly, the fence can be heightened by another 6ins without planning permission.

Correct?

  MAT ALAN 20:21 25 Feb 2010

YES...

  MAT ALAN 20:22 25 Feb 2010

forgot to mention, if you are in any doubt your local council will give you all the info you need...

  peter99co 20:29 25 Feb 2010

I would use a criss-cross trellis to raise the height 6 inch.

Cheap to fix and deters the bad'uns from trying to climb over because it splinters easily.

You will probably told it is against the rules because it can injure people when they try to climb over it.

  BigRik 20:33 25 Feb 2010

I will most likely get in touch with the council if my landlord believes he cannot go any higher.

If I may, does trellis count towards the height of the fence?

  MAT ALAN 21:16 25 Feb 2010

bit pointless if you want it for privacy but it is a cheaper solution...
click here

as long as it still meets the height restrictions i see no reason why trellis cannot be added...

  BigRik 22:02 25 Feb 2010

"You will probably told it is against the rules because it can injure people when they try to climb over it."

In todays climate, you're most likely right!

Thanks very much for your help guys. Some very useful info for me and I've got that link bookmarked.

  spuds 18:55 26 Feb 2010

Best to get a written response from the council in your area. A number of years ago, we wanted to increase the height of our fencing at the rear of the property for possible control of dogs. The local council stated to us 'quite clearly', that the maximum height we could go was 6'0" (which we already had).

A few weeks after our request, the two local school had new wire mesh type perimeter fencing installed, which was 10'0" high. A local new build housing project also installed a security fence around their development. The height of this fencing was also 10'0" high.

Being rather curious, we went back to the council and asked if there had been special concessions given to the school's and the building site, as we and our neighbours had not been informed about the fences being installed without 'due and proper' notification. Rather a very long story, but we were 'allowed' to extend our fencing to 8'0", then 10'0" if required 'on revision'. Funny people are council's and some of their officer's in making decisions and approvals ;o(

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