HOW MUCH - ARE WE RIPPED OFF

  STREETWORK 21:35 20 Nov 2006
Locked

In the USA a PSP cost £104 and in GB it cost £149.

Cost comparison is made from Toys-R-Us.

Games are also much cheaper there. Is it me or are we still getting ripped off...

The lowest cost I have found in the USA was £87.

  lisa02 23:27 20 Nov 2006

I bought a Star Station for my daughter for Christmas.

I paid £60 and it's $60 in USA (£32.33)

We are still getting ripped off.

  Tim1964 23:34 20 Nov 2006

What about the PS3?

Japan £200 (44800 yen)

US £264 ($500)

UK £350 (TBC)

Ripped off?

not at all.

  wee eddie 01:12 21 Nov 2006

Don't buy if you feel the price is too high.

  Jak_1 01:14 21 Nov 2006

Things usually are cheaper in the USA and other countries. However there is not an awfull lot we can do about it! If you are visitng the states on holiday then go with a near empty suitcase , just the essentials, and buy over there. As for electrical equipment then that is a diff story as their elec current is different as is their tv system. When buying abroad it's a case of 'Caveat Emptor'!
Just don't get me on the subject of 'Are we being ripped off', we are, to a degree depending on what you are buying. However they say the same in the States, that they are being ripped off by high prices!

  hijo 01:33 21 Nov 2006

ok my m8 has just seen a DEWALT cordless drill with circular saw & torch all of them are the new 36 VOLT..!!
hes seen it over here on screwfix (i think he said) for around £1200.00 BUT ive seen it on a website in the usa for $300...??? but theres a catch they wont deliver it outside the usa....but it does relate to the post mentioned above...we are paying to much tax but like "wee eddie" said its our choise but i still agree its stupidly expensive...
if anyone wants the websites of the two comparisons let me know i will send u it..:-)
regads
h

  namtas 07:29 21 Nov 2006

Overpriced or not overpriced is a very difficult conclusion to reach and I do not think that one can simply take marked price in isolation to reach a balanced conclusion, their are so many different economic factors involved. What is probably more accurate is to compare standards of living. What I think has been very significant is that internet product awareness has shifted the balance more to the customer and now prices are compared globally instead of in the customer local domain. I am not sure if this is a good or bad thing but it is levelling the playing field somewhat, in general we are now more able to compare and judge prices. Shop around is the answer and we probably never have more freedom and knowledge to do this that we do at the present.

  laurie53 09:05 21 Nov 2006

This is why the British government and big business do not want us to use the Euro. It would enable us to see directly how much we are being ripped off.

I remember before the Euro was adpoted on the mainland a CD cost £16 in the UK and DM16 in Germany. Since there were several Deutschmarks to the pound the rip off was obvious

Laurie

  spuds 12:00 21 Nov 2006

The problem is that here in the UK we do not complain enough, if we suspect a possible wrongdoing. And when anyone complains about certain products, we are often met with the same excuses, that the manufacturers are starving to death, because of their over eager support to their customers.What rubbish, a company will only starve through bad administration.

When cheap airline fares came into being, many a person took a weekend trip to places like New York,in the dear old USA, so they could buy those little goodies that they always wanted but could not really afford here in the UK. This mode of buying as reduced slightly, due to warranty and product support provided via direct overseas purchases.UK consumer law, will not provide the answer to a now defunct USA or any other country purchased item.You are on your own, unless the item as an International warranty, but quite a number of manufacturers have closed this gap, by regional zoning measures.

Going on the mention of Screwfix in an earlier post. Once up on a time their prices simply made mincemeat of B&Q prices for the same product, but the dividing line appears to be getting much narrower, with Screwfix price increases. Should mention, that Screwfix and B&Q are within the same parent company. Screwfix are undertaking a big expansion program, because other competitors have come into the field, having seen the lucrative side of this type of trade. Competition can sometimes have two meanings, one of good, one of bad, depending on which side of the fence you sit on, and how your competitors see you. I once worked for a large organization, and it never stopped us from borrowing a spoonfull of sugar from one of our competitors at times of need. Only to return the compliment, as and when required.

Only recently, I have been comparing prices of some dvd's and cd's. Tesco price £3.99, Poundland £1.00 (perhaps I shouldn't have mentioned that, could result in supplies being withdrawn!).

  jack 12:09 21 Nov 2006

Spuds has it all pretty well
All sorts of reasons for price differentials between
countries for the same item.
The local seller is like as not a separate company from the land of manufacture- has to import smaller quantities[UK is a smaller market that USA]- pay import and shipping charges add VAT and yescharge what the market will bare[ in other words what the mugs will pay- and pay they do and complain afterwards]
Nothing sold in this field is a life essential - if you think it is too expensive - don't buy it -Simple- innit!

  Kate B 12:16 21 Nov 2006

What jack said. I'd further add as an observation that the right price is the price the market will pay. So if the buying public continues to shell out the higher price in the UK, then that by definition is the right price as far as the manufacturers and retailers are concerned.

It does become irritating when you're directed to a UK section of a website and invited to download a more expensive version of precisely the same software that's being offered on, say, the US page.

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