guns gone missing

  finerty 18:51 08 Apr 2011
Locked

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-13011747

came across this quite a few guns have gone missing in London

  Woolwell 18:53 08 Apr 2011

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-13011747

  Woolwell 18:54 08 Apr 2011
  Forum Editor 18:56 08 Apr 2011

"In London the typical firearm being used is a converted imitation."

I suppose one way of dealing with that would be to ban the sale of imitation firearms.

  Woolwell 18:56 08 Apr 2011

Cut and paste of links doesn't work as it used to. You have to click on the hyperlink button or ctrl-L and paste in that window. Be careful that you don't end up with 2 https.

  morddwyd 20:46 08 Apr 2011

I'm surprised. I thought imitations were made of plastic, resin and the like, and difficult to convert.

I thought replicas were the problem, they can be converted in a garden shed by a half competent engineer.

  Cymro. 11:25 09 Apr 2011

I think FE has suggested the answer to this when he posted "I suppose one way of dealing with that would be to ban the sale of imitation firearms". Surely it would be no great loss to anyone if they were banned.

  johndrew 11:48 11 Apr 2011

The problem with banning firearms is threefold: 1. if criminals want them they will get them 2. there are those who use them in a sporting manner 3. there are those who collect imitation items

It seems pointless banning something that is readily available to the criminal element as a result of smuggling (handguns) from Europe and elsewhere, preventing the legal use of firearms in a sporting role (target shooting) or removing the (apparent) pleasure gained by some in collecting replicas. Would it not be better to ensure the security of firearms held by the public, vet those holding them better and ensure that illegal possession had penalties that could not be ignored?

As far as the original post is concerned, it would appear that many of firearms stolen were from a collector in one action and of the others many were deactivated. Whilst I recognise that an armourer is capable of reactivating deactivated items, it does take both parts and expertise.

It is also worthy of note that I was once shown a .22 cal firearm made from the case of a metal Parker retractable ball point pen. Such an easily concealed and lethal weapon must be as dangerous (and useable) as any deactivated item.

  interzone55 14:09 11 Apr 2011

There was a recent case of a man from Rochdale who had been reactivating deactivated firearms for years. Several of his guns had been used in murders and armed robberies in Manchester.

It is relatively simple for someone with the skill and tools to pop the firing mechanism back in a gun.

Regarding a .22 gun being made from the case of a parker pen, I wouldn't like to fire a gun like that, it's likely that it would do more damage to the person who fired it than the intended victim

  johndrew 10:14 12 Apr 2011

"Regarding a .22 gun being made from the case of a parker pen, I wouldn't like to fire a gun like that, it's likely that it would do more damage to the person who fired it than the intended victim"

It was used in crime and it worked. When I saw it, it was held by the Met Police Firearms Unit.

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