Great service or what....?

  Chronos the 2nd 10:28 25 Aug 2013
Locked

As it is still quite here I though I would mention something that happened to me yesterday. I am not sure whether I am writing this as a criticism or praise. You decide.

I received an email notification from Royal mail that a tracked item was going to be delivered yesterday. The item in question was a tin of paint for a PC mod I am currently working on.

Anyway postman (Tam) duly arrived and I showed him the email as I had not received anything like this before and he said that the company sending the item can request this to happen. Good idea I said but even better if the email could have been sent 24 hours earlier giving the recipient a fair bit of warning.

To which he said wait till you sign my machine, as by the time you have closed your front door and walked to your PC there will be a email telling you that the item has been delivered to you.

One has to ask what is the point of that?

So although in theory a good system, email could be a bit earlier in case arrangements for someone to be in to take delivery need to be made and I suppose an email afterwards telling you that the package had been delivered might be useful if the item had been delivered to the wrong address and someone else had signed for it.

But great paint made a fantastic job of my Power Supply Mounting Bracket and a far better price buying online than local.

  alanrwood 10:56 25 Aug 2013

I guess the second email does provide you with the information that it has been delivered just in case it has been delivered wrongly and you can report it urgently and the PO can probably trace it.

  Forum Editor 12:47 25 Aug 2013

What I like about Royal Mail tracking is the way you can see the actual signature of the recipient online, once a package has been delivered.

The point of the email telling you that a package has been delivered is that it clears the Royal Mail system of responsibility - it provides an audit trail, should anyone subsequently raise a query. It's all automated, so there's no overhead involved in terms of staff costs. It's a good idea.

  alanrwood 16:33 25 Aug 2013

FE How does it clear RM of responsibility. If they have delivered it wrongly and the signature is forged. Not sure I understand what you are meaning.

  Forum Editor 16:56 25 Aug 2013

alanrwood

In this context Royal Mail acts as a delivery agent for a third party. It has a duty to deliver the package to a named address, and obtain a signature from someone at that address. It is not under a legal obligation to refuse to deliver to anyone other than the addressee,or to verify that signatures aren't forged. How could a delivery driver possibly know that someone was forging a signature?

The email signifies that Royal Mail delivered to a specified address at a certain time on a certain date, and obtained a signature. That completes its contract with the consigning party. The terms and conditions applying to package deliveries include a provision which states that packages will be handed to the named recipients, or their representatives

  spuds 16:56 25 Aug 2013

I have a number of weekly deliveries from various courier companies, and some seem to have some form of notification scheme. Yodel now appears to send a "We have a parcel for you" email, with a link to track the item. I have been in the situation where I was reading a delivery/tracking email, opened the link, the door bell rang, I signed for an item, then checked straight away, and saw the item had been delivered and signed for a few moments earlier.

But I have also had a some 'bad' dealings with Royal Mail, and especially their translation of the Data Protection Act. One example was a letter and form sent through the Royal Mail guaranteed timed next day recorded and signed for delivery. On the tracking it kept showing that the information wanted updating. After three days I became rather concerned, because it involved a legal transaction. On contacting Royal Mail customer services, as to the location of the item, as was informed that they could not disclose this information due to Data Protection.

Apparently the items that I had send, had been addressed to a business location that had transferred elsewhere, and Royal mail had re-directed. I pointed out that the items had been sent to a company, and not a named individual, so Data Protection didn't apply. Royal Mail would have none of it, they were correct.

The only way I found out where the item had gone, was when the company replied with their 'new' address.

  morddwyd 20:16 25 Aug 2013

On something similar, I recently returned an item to Amazon using the Collect+ service.

My local point is a Spar shop in a little fishing village in east Fife.

By the time I got home, ten minutes or so, I had an e-mail acknowledging the return, and advising that A refund was in course of issue.

  morddwyd 20:17 25 Aug 2013

On something similar, I recently returned an item to Amazon using the Collect+ service.

My local point is a Spar shop in a little fishing village in east Fife.

By the time I got home, ten minutes or so, I had an e-mail acknowledging the return, and advising that A refund was in course of issue.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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