Dangerous Dogs

  Bingalau 13:09 01 Jan 2007
Locked

Just been reading the sad news about a pit bull terrier mauling a little five year old girl to death. I thought these dogs had been banned in this country? If they haven't been then I think it is about time they were. ..Bingalau..

  Jackcoms 13:25 01 Jan 2007

You must also question the sanity of any parents who choose to mix dogs and young children in the same household.

  Forum Editor 14:02 01 Jan 2007

Dogs and young children have been mixing quite happily for thousands of years. I was brought up with dogs in the household, as I'm sure, were millions of other people.

With most 'normal' breeds of domestic dog the risk of a child being attacked by the family pet is lower than the risk of him/her being attacked by a wasp. The problem is the people who insist of having what I call 'status' dogs - the breeds that are specifically designed for aggression. They own these animals because they think it enhances their image - "Don't mess with me, look at the dog I've got".

People who keep such dogs with children are decidely short on brain cells, and are often to be heard defending their foolishness with comments such as "My dogs are lovely, soft as anything - they wouldn't hurt a fly". What they fail to understand is that these lovely, soft animals are attack dogs under the skin - and in the right circumstances they'll revert to type, becoming savage killers. They'll see a small child as prey, especially if there is more than one dog in the house. Animals like that are ticking time-bombs.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 14:07 01 Jan 2007

Personally I would lock the gormless parents up and any that keep attack dogs such as Pit Bulls etc. They have no sense at all. These people have no understanding whatsoever about pets and should be banned from owning them.

G

  rezeeg 14:12 01 Jan 2007

What a sad start to the new year.

  Jackcoms 14:13 01 Jan 2007

I stand by my comment.

In fact, it goes beyond whether or not the dog may attack a child.

I also question where the parent's priorities lie - with caring for the child or caring for the dog - both of which demand a certain degree of thought.

Don't get me wrong - I probably regard dogs as my favourite animal and I have nothing against young children (I used to be one).

But as the parent of 2 daughters, I firmly believe that children and ANY animal which MAY attack a child should be kept firmly apart.

  Forum Editor 14:17 01 Jan 2007

Any good child psychologist will tell you that the benefits to a child of being around a dog are enormous. Seriously-disturbed children who are brought into daily contact with a friendly dog almost always show signs of improvement.

Depriving children of any contact with animals, simply because there might be a slight danger is, to my mind, rather foolish. It doesn't benefit the child in the long run, and often produces an adult who is frightened of all dogs.

Humans and dogs have mixed quite happily since time immemorial, and dog attacks on children are actually extremely rare - far more children die from being attacked by their parents.

  Jackcoms 14:33 01 Jan 2007

"Any good child psychologist will tell you that the benefits to a child of being around a dog are enormous"

I'll have a chat with my elder daughter - she's in the second year of studying for her psychology degree. ;-)

"Depriving children of any contact with animals, simply because there might be a slight danger is, to my mind, rather foolish"

I agree with you wholeheartedly - but my comment was about mixing them in the same household - NOT about depriving them of ALL contact, as you infer.

Perhaps I should have added in my original remarks "until the child is better able to understand how to interact with animals."

  Forum Editor 14:51 01 Jan 2007

There is clear scientific evidence that children growing up with a pet develop better social skills, and have a greater respect for all living things around them, than those who do not have the benefits of pet ownership. Children soon learn that animals consistently show non-judgmental love and loyalty as well as experiencing pain, hunger, illness and eventual death - a poignant preparation for life ahead.

My youngest daughter got her psychology degree a few years ago now, and tells me that the benefits to children of growing up with dogs (and cats) didn't form part of the course at Bristol - maybe your daughter's course will.

  Bingalau 15:28 01 Jan 2007

I spent many of my childhood years working on farms, yes childhood! I mixed quite happily with all sorts of animals and humans and never had an ounce of bother with either. But I only have to look at some of the dogs a certain type of people seem to keep, to know it's not kept as a pet or as a working animal. But as a weapon. maybe the owner of the animal is scared of being attacked by his own type of character. As the FE says "Look at the dog (weapon)I've got". I say round them all up and put them down humanely. No body actually needs this kind of breed. ..Bingalau..

  €dstowe 15:32 01 Jan 2007

"I say round them all up and put them down humanely. No body actually needs this kind of breed."

The keepers or the animals?

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