Art Fraud

  Bingalau 15:32 17 Nov 2007
Locked

I think the old fogies who are on trial for forging expensive replicas of art. Should be given a medal for exposing what is only a racket anyway.

  Cymro. 15:43 17 Nov 2007

I think the old fogies who are on trial for forging expensive replicas of art. Should be given a medal for exposing what is only a racket anyway.

So very, very true and I just love it when something like this happens.

  techie4me 15:56 17 Nov 2007

And to think the guy got away with it for so long.
Must be a few 'experts' who have egg on their faces now!

  Forum Editor 16:11 17 Nov 2007

the other side of the story is that forgeries seriously affect confidence in the art market, and people are cheated out of their hard-earned money. Forging artworks is no different to forging banknotes - the forgers are committing fraud, and it's a very serious crime.

The art market isn't a racket, it's the same as any other market - artworks are worth what people are prepared to pay for them, in the same way that houses are, or designer clothes, or jewels.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 16:40 17 Nov 2007

It was their son that made the forgeries not them. 'So very, very true and I just love it when something like this happens'...and I'm sure you would be bleating ther same if you bought a watch that turned out to be a fake.../eyes raise.

G

  Stuartli 21:43 17 Nov 2007

Such a shame that so many people with considerable talents (hackers are another that come to mind) fail to put them to a more useful role in the community.

  WhiteTruckMan 23:44 17 Nov 2007

After seeing some of the rubbish that wads of cash have been thrown at in the name of the turner prize, I would have to think very hard before confidently making such a statement.

WTM

  Totally-braindead 23:57 17 Nov 2007

If people choose to spend a great deal of money buying some of the tat that is considered art these days then thats up to them.

Regarding the people in court for forging, they knew they were selling forgeries so they knew they were ripping people off so whatever they get they deserve.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 00:44 18 Nov 2007

'After seeing some of the rubbish that wads of cash have been thrown at in the name of the turner prize, I would have to think very hard before confidently making such a statement'..so. you will find it easy to crack this market then? I await your results....yawn.

G

  Forum Editor 01:16 18 Nov 2007

'Racket' is a pretty powerful word in this context - one dictionary describes it as meaning "an illegal enterprise (such as extortion or fraud or drug peddling or prostitution) carried on for profit"

Calling the art business a 'racket', simply because you don't like Turner prize exhibits is a bit like saying that the truck driving business is a racket because you don't like paying delivery charges - it's contextually meaningless, and borne of prejudice. Rubbish is in the eye of the beholder of course, and people have used the terms to describe artworks they don't personally like for centuries. Wads of cash have been thrown at art for centuries, too, it's not something that's unique to the Turner prize candidates.

I might agree with you that some modern artworks have hardly required much skill in their execution, but that's just our opinion, and not a justification for sweeping condemnations of the art market.

  WhiteTruckMan 01:28 18 Nov 2007

If you take a closer look at what I actually said, instead of what you percieved I said, you would realise that I never called the art market a racket. I was merely expressing my doubt as to my ability to confidently make the same statement that you have made, and the reasons why.

Never mind. Only another 5 weeks to go until the magic 'C' word...

WTM

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