Amazing

  spikeychris 20:34 12 Nov 2004
Locked

There are times when you just have to say “How the hell does that work”. I am currently sat in a conservatory on a laptop listening to radio 7 uploading 100 plus images to the world. Because I saw fit, I placed a glass of a very pleasant red, right in the path of the PCMCIA card and watched the upload. It passed right through the wine and I then drank it. The router accepted the link and ‘just a minute’ continued to pipe in my ears.

Am I taking things for granted?...well yeah, But every now and then I do just wonder…….

  Arthur Scrimshaw 20:41 12 Nov 2004

You're just saying that to make the rest of us jealous - and yes it's working!

  Arthur Scrimshaw 20:43 12 Nov 2004

Saying that - I too am enjoying a glass of very nice red wine but not in the luxurious surroundings you describe. :-D

  Arthur Scrimshaw 20:44 12 Nov 2004

Reading your post again it seems you are sitting on a laptop - surely that is not that comfortable?

  VoG II 21:54 12 Nov 2004

Radio waves travel through wine... amazing.

I look forward to reading your paper in Nature next week.

However, as that is a peer reviewed journal, I suggest that you test with a glass of Jack Daniels also.

  Sir Radfordin 22:13 12 Nov 2004

Sign of the times?

click here

  josie mayhem 23:15 12 Nov 2004

How much red stuff have you had (me I prefer the white stuff or the clear (barcardi))

But sometimes the old technology suprises!

My sons face was a piture, thought we had lost the plot, when we asked him to flip an LP over and play the other side.

  kev.Ifty 23:46 12 Nov 2004

I'm confoosed.Are we talking about 'inforared' or 'legless', sorry wireless technology.

My 12 year old Niece came round the other day and was playing with my Kids' cassette player. She could not understand that you had to press and 'hold' the fastforward button to get to the next track on the tape. She would press the button, let go, and expect the next track to play!

She is certainly not daft, just brought up in a CD age.

Kev.

  Forum Editor 08:11 13 Nov 2004

when it was possible for pretty well anyone to understand how things worked - because technological developments were largely mechanical. Internal combustion engines didn't have electronic fuel injection, or onboard engine management computers, so fathers taught sons (not daughters, in that politically incorrect age) how a carburettor worked, or how to set gaps in spark plugs, etc. Even electrical devices were fairly straightforward, and many a keen amateur built radios and mended vacuum cleaners.

What changed all that was the growth of the electronics industry, fuelled by the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and the transistor. Almost overnight the averagely competent person lost touch with how technology worked, and it's more or less stayed that way ever since. Few of us can hope to understand how a wireless router does what it does, and most of us don't care. As long as the various bits of electronic kit inside our computerts do what they were designed to do we're happy.

Life's difficult enough as it is, and trying to understand software is enough of a challenge for most of us.

  jack 08:46 13 Nov 2004

Following on in the FE's train
Many years ago when I was getting interested in this computery lark- I spoke to a service guy attending my firms computer- to air my budding knowledge- I've forgotten now about what, but his reply [or the import thereof] has stayed with me.
It was to the effect 'Look I service these things
I can swap cards around, I can tweak an O/S, but thats it -There is too much to know -so we know what we have got to do'- I am sure this was not a brush off- He was out saide having a 'puff' and I took him a cuppa - It does seem to me that us hobbyists possibly know a little bit more about everything than a perhaps most specialists
Do you all know the old saying
A specialist knows everything about ***** all
A Generalist knows ****al about everything.

Any way having drunk the irradiated wine do you now glow in the dark?

  spikeychris 11:39 13 Nov 2004

VoG I am certain that nothing could ever pass through Jack Daniels, it would be the equivalent of shooting a cap gun at a nuclear bunker but I'll test it tonight to see. jack (not Daniels) do I glow in the dark? I look like a walking talking lightsaber.

FE your comments are so apt, "Internal combustion engines didn't have electronic fuel injection, or onboard engine management computers" My car has been behaving erratically lately so has just gone in for a few tests. It needs a new alternator and one or two other things but the alt has to be 100 amps! at £250. My entire house could be run with just a little more than that.....

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