1984 - 24 years on...

  Quickbeam 08:27 13 May 2008
Locked

Do we really need this technology? click here Are we so incapable of just asking for proof of age...?

  DANZIG 08:41 13 May 2008

I vaguely remember a similar scheme associated with booze consumption a while back that required people to give a thumb print in certain pubs.

As far as I know, that died a death. Rightly so as well, as if I had to give some ID in order to have a pint - that pub would lose my business instantly.

On the face of it (if you pardon the pun!), it seems like a vaguely good idea - BUT, if I was being cynical, I would say that our glorious leaders want to get everyone's details on to the system by whatever means possible. This is just another way to get a certain sector of society tagged.

Thats why decent people are getting fines and criminal records for daft things now (like leaving your wheelie bin open or out on the 'wrong day'). Instantly they are tagged, whereas before they would have stayed 'under the radar' for all their lives.

Maybe I'm being paranoid, but its a thought..

  interzone55 08:53 13 May 2008

"Do we really need this technology? click here Are we so incapable of just asking for proof of age...?"

If you read the story fully you will see that this system uses facial recognition to identify people who have been unable to provide proof of age, so yes the retailer is capable of asking for proof of age, but the kids who weren't able to provide adequate fake ID will be logged by the system.

And DANZIG, where do our glorious leaders come in when it's a retailer that's logging their customers.

  interzone55 09:00 13 May 2008

Now if Budgens had installed this machinery to ascertain customer's ages I would be impressed...

click here

  Joe R 09:05 13 May 2008

alan14,

would this deny the likes of Sharon Osbourne, and lesley Ash from buying cigarettes, from a vending machine in Japan? :)

  Quickbeam 09:08 13 May 2008

"this system uses facial recognition to identify people who have been unable to provide proof of age, so yes the retailer is capable of asking for proof of age,"... So it's a no sale then if the customer can't prove age.

I preferred living in Utopia (circa 1950s Britain)... Oh, such a simple life we had then.

  Brumas 09:15 13 May 2008

You, me and a lot more - in fact I should imagine 100% of our contemporaries have had the best of it!

  interzone55 09:31 13 May 2008

Yes, no sale if you can't produce proof of age, and a good thing to.

There are pretty hefty fines for serving alcohol to people under 18, and more councils are operating honey traps to catch retailers in the act.

Supermarkets have operated a Challenge 21 scheme for a couple of years whereby they request proof of age if you look under 21, Asda have now extended this to 25, although seeing as the average 25 year old looks no older than a 21 year old I'm not sure how they manage this scheme.

If you want to go back to the 50's I suggest you ask Greg Fleming if you can borrow his Fridge click here

  interzone55 09:32 13 May 2008

They would be prevented from buying fags because they're not actually human...

  Forum Editor 19:25 13 May 2008

over what this system is, and who operates it.

1. "Our glorious leaders" - assuming you meant the government - aren't involved. This is an initiative taken by a commercial food retailer.

2. The idea is to help prevent the sale of alcohol to under-age people; it's illegal to sell to them.

3. The face-recognition technology is identical to that used already by Police, and by some football clubs - it compares faces to files stored on a database.

4. If someone attempts to buy alcohol, and the person at the till has doubts about the age of the customer he/she will be asked for proof of age. If that can't be supplied a photograph will be stored on the company's database.

5. In future, all those suspected of being under-age will have their photographs compared to the database, and if a positive match is found the sale will be refused - unless proof of age can be provided.

  Quickbeam 01:22 14 May 2008

that they are using a fairly complex and expensive system to protect themselves from prosecution, that's OK.

The system of prove your age is also OK.

But it seems to me they are so grossly unhappy at the possible loss of one sale of drug products, so much so that rather than lose a possible sale, they make a huge effort to gain a drug related sale at any cost.

They're not doing it for anyones benefit but their own increased sales of killer products...

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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