Wireless or Homeplug

  mb1980y 09:12 02 Aug 2010
Locked

Hi All

Can anyone let me know what i should do in my case, basically I've always been hard wired to the network in my house, but things have changed and I will be moving to a unit that we have had built in the garden which is approx 30 to 40 meters away from the wireless router ( Router is about 6 years old ).

I got hold of some homeplugs breifly from a friend to check on a laptop using an extenstion lead outside and after a speed check i got 1.5mbps, but didnt get to try online gaming.

Need to know what would be the best way to go ? If it is wireless would it help with a more upto date router ?

Hard wired through the house isnt an option at this time.

Note - That the PC is used for online gaming most the time.

Thanks

  onthelimit 09:29 02 Aug 2010

When you get 1.5 on the homeplug, what are you getting hard wired in the house - it's helpful to have a comparison.

  mb1980y 09:34 02 Aug 2010

ops yeah stupid me, 5 to 6mbps,,, on upto 20mb with Zen.

Wish I lived closer the the exchange :(

  dms_05 15:27 02 Aug 2010

Both Wireless and Homeplu involve a fair degree of 'overhead' in that both have to package the data for transmission and unpackage it on reception. However the overhead is about the same and you should expect to loose about 50% of the throughput.

Homeplug will be more reliable because it's essentially hard wired. Also trying it on an extension cable probably reduced its capability. You should make sure the Homeplug is in it's own socket (at both ends) and not in a trailing lead.

The quoted speeds for Homeplugs are generally misleading as they represent the maximum rate the devices can signal each other and not the rate of transfer of data. In any case data transfer is usually quoted in MB/sec (ie mega bytes) whereas Homeplug speeds are in Mbps (ie mega bits) and a byte is made up of 8 bits).

Finally don't forget the LAN connection is either 10, 100 or 1000 Mbps and the Homeplug can't go faster than the limit imposed by the router which is probably 100 Mbps which of course is a little over 10 MB/sec.

Latest wireless is the "n" standard. That would ensure that part of the network is optimal. But if there are other say "g" links in the system I'm not sure if the wireless network will default to "g" throughout. Anyone know?

  mgmcc 12:04 21 Aug 2010

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>>> I'm not sure if the wireless network will default to "g" throughout. Anyone know?

No, it won't. I have computers connecting simultaneously to an 802.11n router at:

802.11n - 300Mbps
802.11n - 150Mbps
802.11g - 54Mbps

don't forget the LAN connection is either 10, 100 or 1000 Mbps and the Homeplug can't go faster than the limit imposed by the router which is probably 100 Mbps which of course is a little over 10 MB/sec.

thanx for your post

Wireless N router give me an extended range when I would be using my iPhone with it?

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