wireless network cards for desktop PC

  logoff 16:28 10 Sep 2013
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Answered

My son is buying a desktop PC and, due to difficulty in getting an ethernet cable into his room, we need to get a network card added to ensure can connect to broadband (we are with O2) this way. His system is likely to be an i5 with Windows 7, probably 64 bit. Is there any best buys or, more importantly, types of card to avoid? Have never had to buy one of these before so don't know much about them, Thanks in advance

  Secret-Squirrel 17:19 10 Sep 2013

"..........we need to get a network card..."

Do you literally mean a network card like this? If so then I'd advise against that type of adapter for three reasons: 1) It involves opening up the PC. 2) Because the aerial(s) are at the back, the PC's case could obstruct the wireless signal and you'd end up with poor performance. 3) Nowadays, there's no advantage over the more popular USB adapters.

I'd recommend something like this wireless USB adapter. Roughly 70% of Amazon customers gave it five stars so it's likely to be a good performer. Another positive feature is that it can be positioned for the best wireless reception due to it being connected to a USB cable.

  logoff 17:41 10 Sep 2013

Thanks Secret_Squirrel that sounds like good advice. Hadn't heard of USB adapters before but should be pretty easy to install etc.

  logoff 17:41 10 Sep 2013

Thanks Secret_Squirrel that sounds like good advice. Hadn't heard of USB adapters before but should be pretty easy to install etc.

  logoff 17:53 10 Sep 2013

apologies for the duplicates of every post! Maybe it is time for me to get a new PC too :((

  lotvic 18:48 10 Sep 2013

I think you would be better off using Homeplugs - no messing about, this is how they work click here

  logoff 18:57 10 Sep 2013

Thanks mannan and lotvic. Lotvic does a homeplug work between two power sockets on the same circuit? Our BT socket and O2 router are both downstairs and son's PC and room are upstairs? Thanks again

  Secret-Squirrel 18:58 10 Sep 2013

mannan, well that's likely to be very confusing for the OP. Reading the original post, what makes you think he needs to buy a compatible adapter to create a repeater?

  lotvic 20:27 10 Sep 2013

Homeplugs work on two different circuits (mine do anyway, one on ring main one on a radial). The rings or circuits (such as upstairs and downstairs) mains must be on the same fuse box / consumer box.

They get a bit flakey if you plug one into an extension power strip though - mine will work ok as long as I have it in the socket on ext strip at the end nearest to the mains wire. (Brand: TP Link)

  logoff 21:40 10 Sep 2013

Thanks Lotvic. Have separate ring main for ground and first floors but same consumer unit. I'll check the details with any Homeplug consider getting. Thanks again, Chris

  woodchip 21:55 10 Sep 2013

It should Still work as both Rings are connected to live at main point in box

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